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Histories of Post-Mortem ContagionIntroduction: The Challenge of the Epidemic Corpse

Histories of Post-Mortem Contagion: Introduction: The Challenge of the Epidemic Corpse [The epidemic corpse has long been understood as a locus of social, moral, and biological danger. In various historical and contemporary settings, it has been seen to pose a challenge to society to which there is no easy response. We ask how the epidemic corpse might also be seen to challenge and threaten central presumptions within social theory. This introduction begins the task of sketching a comparative history of the epidemic corpse as a generative feature of social debate and contestation, from ancient Greece to the present. We take this comparative approach as the basis for rethinking the notion of contagion within the medical humanities more broadly, and we propose a new reading of epidemics as episodes of material production.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Histories of Post-Mortem ContagionIntroduction: The Challenge of the Epidemic Corpse

Editors: Lynteris, Christos; Evans, Nicholas H A

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018
ISBN
978-3-319-62928-5
Pages
1 –25
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-62929-2_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The epidemic corpse has long been understood as a locus of social, moral, and biological danger. In various historical and contemporary settings, it has been seen to pose a challenge to society to which there is no easy response. We ask how the epidemic corpse might also be seen to challenge and threaten central presumptions within social theory. This introduction begins the task of sketching a comparative history of the epidemic corpse as a generative feature of social debate and contestation, from ancient Greece to the present. We take this comparative approach as the basis for rethinking the notion of contagion within the medical humanities more broadly, and we propose a new reading of epidemics as episodes of material production.]

Published: Dec 16, 2017

Keywords: Outbreak Narrative; Epistemic Things; Human Cadaver; Historian Thucydides; Pariset

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