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Histories of Post-Mortem ContagionComposing and Decomposing Bodies: Visualizing Death and Disease in an Era of Global War, Pestilence, and Famine, 1913–1923

Histories of Post-Mortem Contagion: Composing and Decomposing Bodies: Visualizing Death and... [This chapter explores conflict, crisis, and contagion as well as mass death at a time when dramatic new methods were being used to record this. Advancing imaging technologies were developing as part of a visual regime of capture, counting, and containment joining popular culture, state bureaucracy, scientific, and medical research practices. The capturing and viewing of images is presented as a means of integrating the study of the embodied physical and cultural. A primary examination of World War I, 1914–1918, with some discussion of its relevance to the Spanish flu, 1918, and the Povolzhye famine, 1921–1923, foreground discussion of present-day remembrance of the dead and the exhumation of bodies for scientific and historical study.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Histories of Post-Mortem ContagionComposing and Decomposing Bodies: Visualizing Death and Disease in an Era of Global War, Pestilence, and Famine, 1913–1923

Editors: Lynteris, Christos; Evans, Nicholas H A

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018
ISBN
978-3-319-62928-5
Pages
135 –164
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-62929-2_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter explores conflict, crisis, and contagion as well as mass death at a time when dramatic new methods were being used to record this. Advancing imaging technologies were developing as part of a visual regime of capture, counting, and containment joining popular culture, state bureaucracy, scientific, and medical research practices. The capturing and viewing of images is presented as a means of integrating the study of the embodied physical and cultural. A primary examination of World War I, 1914–1918, with some discussion of its relevance to the Spanish flu, 1918, and the Povolzhye famine, 1921–1923, foreground discussion of present-day remembrance of the dead and the exhumation of bodies for scientific and historical study.]

Published: Dec 16, 2017

Keywords: Medical Research Practice; Container Connection; Horse-drawn Transport; Official Photographs; Humanitarian Assistancehumanitarian Assistance

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