Heroin and cocaine intravenous self-administration in rats: Mediation by separate neural systems

Heroin and cocaine intravenous self-administration in rats: Mediation by separate neural systems 213 78 78 3 3 Aaron Ettenberg Hugh O. Pettit Floyd E. Bloom George F. Koob Arthur Vining Davis Center for Behavioral Neurobiology The Salk Institute 92138 San Diego CA USA Department of Psychology University of California 93106 Santa Barbara CA USA Abstract The hypothesis that separate neural systems mediate the reinforcing properties of opiate and psychomotor stimulant drugs was tested in rats trained to lever-press for IV injections of either cocaine or heroin during daily 3-h sessions. Pretreatment with the opiate receptor antagonist drug naltrexone produced dose-dependent increases in heroin self-administration, but had no effect on the rate or pattern of cocaine self-administration. Similarly, pretreatment with low doses of the dopamine antagonist drug alpha-flupenthixol produced dose-dependent increases in cocaine but not heroin self-administration. High doses of alpha-flupenthixol eliminated all responding for cocaine and slightly reduced heroin self-administration. The specificity with which the two antagonist drugs exerted their behavioral effects strongly suggests that independent neural substrates are responsible for the reinforcing actions of heroind and cocaine. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Heroin and cocaine intravenous self-administration in rats: Mediation by separate neural systems

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00428151
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 78 78 3 3 Aaron Ettenberg Hugh O. Pettit Floyd E. Bloom George F. Koob Arthur Vining Davis Center for Behavioral Neurobiology The Salk Institute 92138 San Diego CA USA Department of Psychology University of California 93106 Santa Barbara CA USA Abstract The hypothesis that separate neural systems mediate the reinforcing properties of opiate and psychomotor stimulant drugs was tested in rats trained to lever-press for IV injections of either cocaine or heroin during daily 3-h sessions. Pretreatment with the opiate receptor antagonist drug naltrexone produced dose-dependent increases in heroin self-administration, but had no effect on the rate or pattern of cocaine self-administration. Similarly, pretreatment with low doses of the dopamine antagonist drug alpha-flupenthixol produced dose-dependent increases in cocaine but not heroin self-administration. High doses of alpha-flupenthixol eliminated all responding for cocaine and slightly reduced heroin self-administration. The specificity with which the two antagonist drugs exerted their behavioral effects strongly suggests that independent neural substrates are responsible for the reinforcing actions of heroind and cocaine.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 1982

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