Genetic structure and distribution of Photololigo spp. in Australia

Genetic structure and distribution of Photololigo spp. in Australia 227 118 118 1 1 J. Yeatman J. A. H. Benzie Department of Marine Biology James Cook University 4811 Townsville Queensland Australia Australian Institute of Marine Science P. M. B. 3 4810 Townsville Queensland Australia Abstract Four species of Photololigo were identified using allozymes from the northern waters of Australia between the North West Shelf (114°00E) and Brisbane (153°00E). Two of these species fitted the gross morphology of P. edulis documented from Japan and two taxa shared the distinguishing features of P. chinensis. F -statistic analyses revealed no major population genetic structuring in any of the species over the geographical range sampled and all populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Given that the distributions of the species appear to be correlated with depth, at least during the austral summer, this panmixia is considered to reflect extensive gene flow through longshore movement of these squid. It is suggested that depth constraints, or factors associated with depth, act as effective barriers to gene flow and, therefore, provide mechanisms for allopatric speciation in this genus. The data from northern Australia indicate that the current view that Loligo species have broad distributions may need revision and that a number of widespread taxa (such as P. edulis and P. chinensis ) are likely to comprise a series of hitherto unrecognised allopatric sibling species. Heterozygosity levels were low for all species except Photololigo sp. 1, which had a restricted deep-water distribution. These data are concordant with the habitat specialist-generalist model, which is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

Genetic structure and distribution of Photololigo spp. in Australia

Marine Biology, Volume 118 (1) – Mar 1, 1994

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biomedicine general; Oceanography; Ecology; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00699221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

227 118 118 1 1 J. Yeatman J. A. H. Benzie Department of Marine Biology James Cook University 4811 Townsville Queensland Australia Australian Institute of Marine Science P. M. B. 3 4810 Townsville Queensland Australia Abstract Four species of Photololigo were identified using allozymes from the northern waters of Australia between the North West Shelf (114°00E) and Brisbane (153°00E). Two of these species fitted the gross morphology of P. edulis documented from Japan and two taxa shared the distinguishing features of P. chinensis. F -statistic analyses revealed no major population genetic structuring in any of the species over the geographical range sampled and all populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Given that the distributions of the species appear to be correlated with depth, at least during the austral summer, this panmixia is considered to reflect extensive gene flow through longshore movement of these squid. It is suggested that depth constraints, or factors associated with depth, act as effective barriers to gene flow and, therefore, provide mechanisms for allopatric speciation in this genus. The data from northern Australia indicate that the current view that Loligo species have broad distributions may need revision and that a number of widespread taxa (such as P. edulis and P. chinensis ) are likely to comprise a series of hitherto unrecognised allopatric sibling species. Heterozygosity levels were low for all species except Photololigo sp. 1, which had a restricted deep-water distribution. These data are concordant with the habitat specialist-generalist model, which is discussed.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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