Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Fundamentals of RCS Prediction Methodology using Parallelized Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) and Finite Element Pre-processorIntroduction

Fundamentals of RCS Prediction Methodology using Parallelized Numerical Electromagnetics Code... [With the advent of stealth technology, precise computation of radar cross section (RCS) has become an inevitable component in the efficient design and development of military vehicles. However, the scattering characterization of stealth platforms is undoubtedly the most demanding problem in modern applied electromagnetics. When it comes to the computation of scattered fields from conducting structures, the accuracy and efficacy of a method of moments (MoM) based integral equation formulation are difficult to be surpassed. Amongst MoM based solvers, Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) is a versatile open source computer program used for the electromagnetic analysis of metallic structures in the presence of sources or incident fields. Since its development, NEC has continued to be one of the most widely used electromagnetic simulation codes even in the presence of commercial MoM based solvers. This can be attributed to the availability of the well-documented computational engine. However, a serious drawback of NEC is the absence of an appropriate module for the wire grid-based meshing of geometries and the consequent generation of segmentation data in an NEC compatible format. This is one of the most intricate and time-consuming step in the computation of RCS using NEC. In this regard, this brief presents a detailed methodology for the computation of RCS of metallic structures using a parallelized version of NEC in conjunction with a finite element preprocessor, which has been strategically incorporated for geometry modelling catering to NEC guidelines. It includes a thorough overview of the theoretical background of NEC including all relevant aspects of formulation and modelling.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Fundamentals of RCS Prediction Methodology using Parallelized Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) and Finite Element Pre-processorIntroduction

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/fundamentals-of-rcs-prediction-methodology-using-parallelized-Fxxh4wEg70

References (2)

Publisher
Springer Singapore
Copyright
© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2021
ISBN
978-981-15-7163-3
Pages
1 –3
DOI
10.1007/978-981-15-7164-0_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[With the advent of stealth technology, precise computation of radar cross section (RCS) has become an inevitable component in the efficient design and development of military vehicles. However, the scattering characterization of stealth platforms is undoubtedly the most demanding problem in modern applied electromagnetics. When it comes to the computation of scattered fields from conducting structures, the accuracy and efficacy of a method of moments (MoM) based integral equation formulation are difficult to be surpassed. Amongst MoM based solvers, Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) is a versatile open source computer program used for the electromagnetic analysis of metallic structures in the presence of sources or incident fields. Since its development, NEC has continued to be one of the most widely used electromagnetic simulation codes even in the presence of commercial MoM based solvers. This can be attributed to the availability of the well-documented computational engine. However, a serious drawback of NEC is the absence of an appropriate module for the wire grid-based meshing of geometries and the consequent generation of segmentation data in an NEC compatible format. This is one of the most intricate and time-consuming step in the computation of RCS using NEC. In this regard, this brief presents a detailed methodology for the computation of RCS of metallic structures using a parallelized version of NEC in conjunction with a finite element preprocessor, which has been strategically incorporated for geometry modelling catering to NEC guidelines. It includes a thorough overview of the theoretical background of NEC including all relevant aspects of formulation and modelling.]

Published: Sep 13, 2020

There are no references for this article.