Functional reinnervation of the neostriatum in the adult rat by use of intraparenchymal grafting of dissociated cell suspensions from the substantia nigra

Functional reinnervation of the neostriatum in the adult rat by use of intraparenchymal grafting... Dissociated cell suspensions were prepared from the substantia nigra of 15–17 day-old rat embryos and grafted via an intraparenchymal injection into the depth of the neostriatum of adult recipient rats. The survival and fibre outgrowth of the dopamine-containing neurones in the implants were studied by fluorescence histochemistry, and the functional capacity of the grafts was monitored by repeated testing of the amphetamine-induced turning behaviour of the implanted rats. Before transplantation the target neostriatum of the recipient rats was denervated of its normal dopaminergic innervation by an injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the ipsilateral nigrostriatal dopamine pathway. The completeness of the denervation was ascertained by measurement of the intensity of the amphetamine-induced turning response. After injection of the dissociated cells large numbers of dopamine-containing neurones were found in clusters at the site of injection as well as scattered in the apparently intact neostriatal tissue up to a distance of about 0.5 mm from the site of injection. Extensive dopamine-containing fibre networks had developed around the implant. These newly formed fibres, which were most abundant around the cell clusters at the injection site, extended in a loose network into large areas of the initially denervated caudate-putamen. In all animals with surviving dopamine neurones the amphetamine-induced turning response was reduced, and in the most extensively reinnervated cases even reversed, within 3–5 weeks after transplantation. This strongly suggests that the implanted dopamine neurones are capable of restoring dopaminergic neurotransmission in the denervated neostriatum, probably via reinnervation of the denervated neostriatal tissue. The use of dissociated brain tissue preparations thus permits reliable intraparenchymal grafting of neurones to plausibly any desired site within the central nervous system, and should open entirely new possibilities for investigation of neuronal growth dynamics and functional reconstruction of damaged brain circuits, perhaps even in brains of larger mammals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cell and Tissue Research Springer Journals

Functional reinnervation of the neostriatum in the adult rat by use of intraparenchymal grafting of dissociated cell suspensions from the substantia nigra

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/functional-reinnervation-of-the-neostriatum-in-the-adult-rat-by-use-of-ju0U6000nm
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Endocrinology; Neurology; Cell Biology
ISSN
0302-766X
eISSN
1432-0878
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00234031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dissociated cell suspensions were prepared from the substantia nigra of 15–17 day-old rat embryos and grafted via an intraparenchymal injection into the depth of the neostriatum of adult recipient rats. The survival and fibre outgrowth of the dopamine-containing neurones in the implants were studied by fluorescence histochemistry, and the functional capacity of the grafts was monitored by repeated testing of the amphetamine-induced turning behaviour of the implanted rats. Before transplantation the target neostriatum of the recipient rats was denervated of its normal dopaminergic innervation by an injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the ipsilateral nigrostriatal dopamine pathway. The completeness of the denervation was ascertained by measurement of the intensity of the amphetamine-induced turning response. After injection of the dissociated cells large numbers of dopamine-containing neurones were found in clusters at the site of injection as well as scattered in the apparently intact neostriatal tissue up to a distance of about 0.5 mm from the site of injection. Extensive dopamine-containing fibre networks had developed around the implant. These newly formed fibres, which were most abundant around the cell clusters at the injection site, extended in a loose network into large areas of the initially denervated caudate-putamen. In all animals with surviving dopamine neurones the amphetamine-induced turning response was reduced, and in the most extensively reinnervated cases even reversed, within 3–5 weeks after transplantation. This strongly suggests that the implanted dopamine neurones are capable of restoring dopaminergic neurotransmission in the denervated neostriatum, probably via reinnervation of the denervated neostriatal tissue. The use of dissociated brain tissue preparations thus permits reliable intraparenchymal grafting of neurones to plausibly any desired site within the central nervous system, and should open entirely new possibilities for investigation of neuronal growth dynamics and functional reconstruction of damaged brain circuits, perhaps even in brains of larger mammals.

Journal

Cell and Tissue ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off