Focal inflammation in the brain

Focal inflammation in the brain We hypothesize that amyloid (Aβ) peptide-containing neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease represent chronic inflammatory foci mediated by the actions of the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. In support of this, in vitro studies show that the (Aβ) peptide is a potent complement activator and that such complement activation leads to the formation of covalent (Aβ)-C3 activation fragment complexes, the generation of the chemokine-like C5a complement activation peptide, and the formation of the proinflammatory C5b-9 complex in functionally active form able to insert into neuronal cell membranes. Other studies show that C5a, together with (Aβ), synergistically augments the release of proinflammatory cytokines from human monocytes. These studies, which provide in vitro support for the hypothesis, are being pursued in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Immunologic Research Springer Journals

Focal inflammation in the brain

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Humana Press Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Allergology; Immunology; Medicine/Public Health, general; Internal Medicine
ISSN
0257-277X
eISSN
1559-0755
DOI
10.1385/IR:21:2-3:159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We hypothesize that amyloid (Aβ) peptide-containing neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease represent chronic inflammatory foci mediated by the actions of the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. In support of this, in vitro studies show that the (Aβ) peptide is a potent complement activator and that such complement activation leads to the formation of covalent (Aβ)-C3 activation fragment complexes, the generation of the chemokine-like C5a complement activation peptide, and the formation of the proinflammatory C5b-9 complex in functionally active form able to insert into neuronal cell membranes. Other studies show that C5a, together with (Aβ), synergistically augments the release of proinflammatory cytokines from human monocytes. These studies, which provide in vitro support for the hypothesis, are being pursued in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

Journal

Immunologic ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 25, 2007

References

  • The inflammatory response system of brain: implications for therapy of Alzheimer and other neurodegenerative diseases
    McGeer, PL; McGeer, EG

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