Flooding and salinity effects on growth and survival of four common forested wetland species

Flooding and salinity effects on growth and survival of four common forested wetland species The survival, growth, and biomass of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.), water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.), and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) seedlings were examined in an experiment varying water levels (watered, flooded) and salinity levels (0, 2, and 10 ppt, plus a simulated storm surge with 32 ppt saltwater). All seedlings, except for those flooded with 10 ppt saltwater, survived to the end of the experiment. In 10 ppt saltwater, flooded baldcypress, water tupelo, and green ash survived two weeks whereas Chinese tallow survived for 6 weeks. However, a second set of slightly older baldcypress, water tupelo, and Chinese tallow seedlings survived eight weeks of flooding with 10 ppt saltwater. When carried through the winter to the beginning of the second growing season, flooded baldcypress and Chinese tallow seedlings from the 0 and 2 ppt treatments leafed out, but only Chinese tallow recovered from the saltwater surge treatment. The diameter and growth (height) of each species was not affected when watered with 2 ppt saltwater, except for the effects of the height growth of baldcypress. Growth was reduced for all species when watered with 10 ppt saltwater. The diameter growth of green ash was reduced by freshwater flooding. The diameter growth of baldcypress and water tupelo was greater when flooded with fresh water. Flooding with 2 ppt saltwater caused a significant reduction in diameter growth in water tupelo, green ash, and Chinese tallow, but not in baldcypress. Root and stem biomass values were not significantly different for any species between the 0 and 2 ppt salinity watering treatments. However, seedlings watered with 10 ppt saltwater had significantly lower root and stem biomass values, except for baldcypress roots and green ash stems. Baldcypress was least affected by flooding with 0 and 2 ppt saltwater, although there were slight reductions in root biomass with increasing salinity. Because of the susceptibility of the seedlings of these four species to increases in flooding and salinity, their regeneration may be limited in the future, thereby causing shifts in species composition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wetlands Ecology and Management Springer Journals

Flooding and salinity effects on growth and survival of four common forested wetland species

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/flooding-and-salinity-effects-on-growth-and-survival-of-four-common-GZXuFS36YA
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Conservation Biology/Ecology; Environmental Law/Policy/Ecojustice; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Hydrology/Water Resources; Water Quality/Water Pollution
ISSN
0923-4861
eISSN
1572-9834
DOI
10.1023/A:1008251127131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The survival, growth, and biomass of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.), water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.), and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) seedlings were examined in an experiment varying water levels (watered, flooded) and salinity levels (0, 2, and 10 ppt, plus a simulated storm surge with 32 ppt saltwater). All seedlings, except for those flooded with 10 ppt saltwater, survived to the end of the experiment. In 10 ppt saltwater, flooded baldcypress, water tupelo, and green ash survived two weeks whereas Chinese tallow survived for 6 weeks. However, a second set of slightly older baldcypress, water tupelo, and Chinese tallow seedlings survived eight weeks of flooding with 10 ppt saltwater. When carried through the winter to the beginning of the second growing season, flooded baldcypress and Chinese tallow seedlings from the 0 and 2 ppt treatments leafed out, but only Chinese tallow recovered from the saltwater surge treatment. The diameter and growth (height) of each species was not affected when watered with 2 ppt saltwater, except for the effects of the height growth of baldcypress. Growth was reduced for all species when watered with 10 ppt saltwater. The diameter growth of green ash was reduced by freshwater flooding. The diameter growth of baldcypress and water tupelo was greater when flooded with fresh water. Flooding with 2 ppt saltwater caused a significant reduction in diameter growth in water tupelo, green ash, and Chinese tallow, but not in baldcypress. Root and stem biomass values were not significantly different for any species between the 0 and 2 ppt salinity watering treatments. However, seedlings watered with 10 ppt saltwater had significantly lower root and stem biomass values, except for baldcypress roots and green ash stems. Baldcypress was least affected by flooding with 0 and 2 ppt saltwater, although there were slight reductions in root biomass with increasing salinity. Because of the susceptibility of the seedlings of these four species to increases in flooding and salinity, their regeneration may be limited in the future, thereby causing shifts in species composition.

Journal

Wetlands Ecology and ManagementSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 27, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off