Fine root dynamics, coarse root biomass, root distribution, and soil respiration in a multispecies riparian buffer in Central Iowa, USA

Fine root dynamics, coarse root biomass, root distribution, and soil respiration in a... By influencing belowground processes, streamside vegetation affects soil processes important to surface water quality. We conducted this study to compare root distributions and dynamics, and total soil respiration among six sites comprising an agricultural buffer system: poplar (Populus × euroamericana‘ Eugenei), switchgrass, cool-season pasture grasses, corn (Zea mays L.), and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). The dynamics of fine (0--2 mm) and small roots (2--5 mm) were assessed by sequentially collecting 35 cm deep, 5.4 cm diameter cores from April through November. Coarse roots were described by excavating 1 × 1 × 2 m pits and collecting all roots in 20 cm depth increments. Root distributions within the soil profile were determined by counting roots that intersected the walls of the excavated pits. Soil respiration was measured monthly from July to October using the soda-lime technique. Over the sampling period, live fine-root biomass in the top 35 cm of soil averaged over 6 Mg ha -1 for the cool-season grass, poplar, and switchgrass sites while root biomass in the crop fields was < 2.3 Mg ha -1 at its maximum. Roots of trees, cool-season grasses, and switchgrass extended to more than 1.5 m in depth, with switchgrass roots being more widely distributed in deeper horizons. Root density was significantly greater under switchgrass and cool-season grasses than under corn or soybean. Soil respiration rates, which ranged from 1.4--7.2 g C m -2 day -1 , were up to twice as high under the poplar, switchgrass and cool-season grasses as in the cropped fields. Abundant fine roots, deep rooting depths, and high soil respiration rates in the multispecies riparian buffer zones suggest that these buffer systems added more organic matter to the soil profile, and therefore provided better conditions for nutrient sequestration within the riparian buffers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agroforestry Systems Springer Journals

Fine root dynamics, coarse root biomass, root distribution, and soil respiration in a multispecies riparian buffer in Central Iowa, USA

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/fine-root-dynamics-coarse-root-biomass-root-distribution-and-soil-9WnhJk09L0
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Forestry
ISSN
0167-4366
eISSN
1572-9680
DOI
10.1023/A:1006221921806
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By influencing belowground processes, streamside vegetation affects soil processes important to surface water quality. We conducted this study to compare root distributions and dynamics, and total soil respiration among six sites comprising an agricultural buffer system: poplar (Populus × euroamericana‘ Eugenei), switchgrass, cool-season pasture grasses, corn (Zea mays L.), and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). The dynamics of fine (0--2 mm) and small roots (2--5 mm) were assessed by sequentially collecting 35 cm deep, 5.4 cm diameter cores from April through November. Coarse roots were described by excavating 1 × 1 × 2 m pits and collecting all roots in 20 cm depth increments. Root distributions within the soil profile were determined by counting roots that intersected the walls of the excavated pits. Soil respiration was measured monthly from July to October using the soda-lime technique. Over the sampling period, live fine-root biomass in the top 35 cm of soil averaged over 6 Mg ha -1 for the cool-season grass, poplar, and switchgrass sites while root biomass in the crop fields was < 2.3 Mg ha -1 at its maximum. Roots of trees, cool-season grasses, and switchgrass extended to more than 1.5 m in depth, with switchgrass roots being more widely distributed in deeper horizons. Root density was significantly greater under switchgrass and cool-season grasses than under corn or soybean. Soil respiration rates, which ranged from 1.4--7.2 g C m -2 day -1 , were up to twice as high under the poplar, switchgrass and cool-season grasses as in the cropped fields. Abundant fine roots, deep rooting depths, and high soil respiration rates in the multispecies riparian buffer zones suggest that these buffer systems added more organic matter to the soil profile, and therefore provided better conditions for nutrient sequestration within the riparian buffers.

Journal

Agroforestry SystemsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off