Ferrous iron dependent nitric oxide production in nitrate reducing cultures of Escherichia coli

Ferrous iron dependent nitric oxide production in nitrate reducing cultures of Escherichia coli 203 155 155 4 4 Hans J. Brons Wilfred R. Hagen Alexander J. B. Zehnder Department of Microbiology, Center of Biomolecular Sciences Wageningen Agricultural University Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4 6703 CT Wageningen The Netherlands Department of Biochemistry, Center of Biomolecular Sciences Wageningen Agricultural University Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4 6703 CT Wageningen The Netherlands Eurocetus B. V. Paasheuvelweg 30 1105 BJ Amsterdam The Netherlands Abstract l -Lactate-driven ferric and nitrate reduction was studied in Escherichia coli E4. Ferric iron reduction activity in E. coli E4 was found to be constitutive. Contrary to nitrate, ferric iron could not be used as electron acceptor for growth. “Ferric iron reductase” activity of 9 nmol Fe 2+ mg -1 protein min -1 could not be inhibited by inhibitors for the respiratory chain, like Rotenone, quinacrine, Actinomycin A, or potassium cyanide. Active cells and l -lactate-driven nitrate respiration in E. coli E4 leading to the production of nitrite, was reduced to about 20% of its maximum activity with 5 mM ferric iron, or to about 50% in presence of 5 mM ferrous iron. The inhibition was caused by nitric oxide formed by a purely chemical reduction of nitrite by ferrous iron. Nitric oxide was further chemically reduced by ferrous iron to nitrous oxide. With electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the presence of a free (Fe 2+ -NO) complex was shown. In presence of ferrous or ferric iron and l -lactate, nitrate was anaerobically converted to nitric oxide and nitrous oxide by the combined action of E. coli E4 and chemical reduction reactions (chemodenitrification). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Microbiology Springer Journals

Ferrous iron dependent nitric oxide production in nitrate reducing cultures of Escherichia coli

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/ferrous-iron-dependent-nitric-oxide-production-in-nitrate-reducing-vX1e2X36G3
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biotechnology; Biochemistry, general; Cell Biology; Ecology; Microbial Ecology; Microbiology
ISSN
0302-8933
eISSN
1432-072X
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00243453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

203 155 155 4 4 Hans J. Brons Wilfred R. Hagen Alexander J. B. Zehnder Department of Microbiology, Center of Biomolecular Sciences Wageningen Agricultural University Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4 6703 CT Wageningen The Netherlands Department of Biochemistry, Center of Biomolecular Sciences Wageningen Agricultural University Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4 6703 CT Wageningen The Netherlands Eurocetus B. V. Paasheuvelweg 30 1105 BJ Amsterdam The Netherlands Abstract l -Lactate-driven ferric and nitrate reduction was studied in Escherichia coli E4. Ferric iron reduction activity in E. coli E4 was found to be constitutive. Contrary to nitrate, ferric iron could not be used as electron acceptor for growth. “Ferric iron reductase” activity of 9 nmol Fe 2+ mg -1 protein min -1 could not be inhibited by inhibitors for the respiratory chain, like Rotenone, quinacrine, Actinomycin A, or potassium cyanide. Active cells and l -lactate-driven nitrate respiration in E. coli E4 leading to the production of nitrite, was reduced to about 20% of its maximum activity with 5 mM ferric iron, or to about 50% in presence of 5 mM ferrous iron. The inhibition was caused by nitric oxide formed by a purely chemical reduction of nitrite by ferrous iron. Nitric oxide was further chemically reduced by ferrous iron to nitrous oxide. With electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the presence of a free (Fe 2+ -NO) complex was shown. In presence of ferrous or ferric iron and l -lactate, nitrate was anaerobically converted to nitric oxide and nitrous oxide by the combined action of E. coli E4 and chemical reduction reactions (chemodenitrification).

Journal

Archives of MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off