Factors contributing to non-randomness in species Co-occurrences on Islands

Factors contributing to non-randomness in species Co-occurrences on Islands There has been dispute whether patterns of species co-occurrence on islands are largely random. We present a new method for testing this question; this method lets one not only examine whether a whole fauna is non-randomly structured, but also identify in which direction and by how much each particular species combination deviates from expectations based on randomness. Application of this method to the whole Bismarck and New Hebridean avifaunas, and to two particular guilds, shows that some pairs of species have more exclusive distributions than expected for random placement of species, because of competition, differing distributional strategies, or different geographical orgins. Other pairs of species have more coincident distributions than expected, because of shared habitat, single-island endemism, shared distributional strategies, or shared geographical origins. Much of the information about non-random co-occurrence is contained in the incidence graphs for occurrence of individual species. Finally, our present understanding of assembly rules is summarized. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Factors contributing to non-randomness in species Co-occurrences on Islands

Oecologia, Volume 52 (1) – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00349014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been dispute whether patterns of species co-occurrence on islands are largely random. We present a new method for testing this question; this method lets one not only examine whether a whole fauna is non-randomly structured, but also identify in which direction and by how much each particular species combination deviates from expectations based on randomness. Application of this method to the whole Bismarck and New Hebridean avifaunas, and to two particular guilds, shows that some pairs of species have more exclusive distributions than expected for random placement of species, because of competition, differing distributional strategies, or different geographical orgins. Other pairs of species have more coincident distributions than expected, because of shared habitat, single-island endemism, shared distributional strategies, or shared geographical origins. Much of the information about non-random co-occurrence is contained in the incidence graphs for occurrence of individual species. Finally, our present understanding of assembly rules is summarized.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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