Extended statistical approaches to modelling spatial pattern in biodiversity in northeast New South Wales. II. Community-level modelling

Extended statistical approaches to modelling spatial pattern in biodiversity in northeast New... Regional conservation planning can often make more effective use of sparse biological data by linking these data to remotely mapped environmental variables through statistical modelling. While modelling distributions of individual species is the best known and most widely used approach to such modelling, there are many situations in which more information can be extracted from available data by supplementing, or replacing, species-level modelling with modelling of communities or assemblages. This paper provides an overview of approaches to community-level modelling employed in a series of major land-use planning processes in the northeast New South Wales region of Australia, and evaluates how well communities and assemblages derived using these techniques function as surrogates in regional conservation planning. We also outline three new directions that may enhance the effectiveness of community-level modelling by: (1) more closely integrating modelling with traditional ecological mapping (e.g. vegetation mapping); (2) more tightly linking numerical classification and spatial modelling through application of canonical classification techniques; and (3) enhancing the applicability of modelling to data-poor regions through employment of a new technique for modelling spatial pattern in compositional dissimilarity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biodiversity and Conservation Springer Journals

Extended statistical approaches to modelling spatial pattern in biodiversity in northeast New South Wales. II. Community-level modelling

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Evolutionary Biology; Tree Biology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0960-3115
eISSN
1572-9710
DOI
10.1023/A:1021374009951
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Regional conservation planning can often make more effective use of sparse biological data by linking these data to remotely mapped environmental variables through statistical modelling. While modelling distributions of individual species is the best known and most widely used approach to such modelling, there are many situations in which more information can be extracted from available data by supplementing, or replacing, species-level modelling with modelling of communities or assemblages. This paper provides an overview of approaches to community-level modelling employed in a series of major land-use planning processes in the northeast New South Wales region of Australia, and evaluates how well communities and assemblages derived using these techniques function as surrogates in regional conservation planning. We also outline three new directions that may enhance the effectiveness of community-level modelling by: (1) more closely integrating modelling with traditional ecological mapping (e.g. vegetation mapping); (2) more tightly linking numerical classification and spatial modelling through application of canonical classification techniques; and (3) enhancing the applicability of modelling to data-poor regions through employment of a new technique for modelling spatial pattern in compositional dissimilarity.

Journal

Biodiversity and ConservationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 11, 2004

References

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