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Exile, Science and BildungThe “Other Germany” and the Question of Bildung: Weimar to Bonn

Exile, Science and Bildung: The “Other Germany” and the Question of Bildung: Weimar to Bonn [The recognition of a difference between the scientific dimension of institutionalized knowledge in society and the rhetorical, didactic one, as well as the potential for conflict between them, is by no means unique to modern German culture. For centuries, English universities put the formation of clergymen and gentlemen ahead of the advancement of knowledge, and American colleges vied with each other in adapting both instruction and inquiry to the building of piety or moral character or civic virtue, not to speak of the utilitarian didactic achievements of inculcating commercial initiative or housewifely guile. Francis Bacon and Adam Smith denounced Oxford and Cambridge early in the modern era, and their spiritual heirs later created the London School of Economics, while the protests of Charles Beard and Thorstein Veblen against the higher education in America helped to bring into being the New School that was eventually to harbor an important contingent of the German émigrés of 1933.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Exile, Science and BildungThe “Other Germany” and the Question of Bildung: Weimar to Bonn

Editors: Kettler, David; Lauer, Gerhard
Exile, Science and Bildung — Feb 22, 2016

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2005
ISBN
978-1-349-73456-6
Pages
1 –18
DOI
10.1007/978-1-137-04596-6_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The recognition of a difference between the scientific dimension of institutionalized knowledge in society and the rhetorical, didactic one, as well as the potential for conflict between them, is by no means unique to modern German culture. For centuries, English universities put the formation of clergymen and gentlemen ahead of the advancement of knowledge, and American colleges vied with each other in adapting both instruction and inquiry to the building of piety or moral character or civic virtue, not to speak of the utilitarian didactic achievements of inculcating commercial initiative or housewifely guile. Francis Bacon and Adam Smith denounced Oxford and Cambridge early in the modern era, and their spiritual heirs later created the London School of Economics, while the protests of Charles Beard and Thorstein Veblen against the higher education in America helped to bring into being the New School that was eventually to harbor an important contingent of the German émigrés of 1933.]

Published: Feb 22, 2016

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