Endocannabinoids in adipocytes during differentiation and their role in glucose uptake

Endocannabinoids in adipocytes during differentiation and their role in glucose uptake The molecular basis for the control of energy balance by the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is still unclear. Here, we show that murine 3T3-L1 fibroblasts have the machinery to bind, synthesize and degrade AEA, and that their differentiation into adipocytes increases by approximately twofold the binding efficiency of cannabinoid receptors (CBR), and by approximately twofold and approximately threefold, respectively, the catalytic efficiency of the AEA transporter and AEA hydrolase. In contrast, the activity of the AEA synthetase and the binding efficiency of vanilloid receptor were not affected by the differentiation process. In addition, we demonstrate that AEA increases by approximately twofold insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in differentiated adipocytes, according to a CB1R-dependent mechanism that involves nitric oxide synthase, but not lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase. We also show that AEA binding to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, known to induce differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts into adipocytes, is not involved in the stimulation of glucose uptake. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences Springer Journals

Endocannabinoids in adipocytes during differentiation and their role in glucose uptake

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel
Subject
Life Sciences; Biomedicine general; Life Sciences, general; Biochemistry, general; Cell Biology
ISSN
1420-682X
eISSN
1420-9071
DOI
10.1007/s00018-006-6445-4
pmid
17187172
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The molecular basis for the control of energy balance by the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is still unclear. Here, we show that murine 3T3-L1 fibroblasts have the machinery to bind, synthesize and degrade AEA, and that their differentiation into adipocytes increases by approximately twofold the binding efficiency of cannabinoid receptors (CBR), and by approximately twofold and approximately threefold, respectively, the catalytic efficiency of the AEA transporter and AEA hydrolase. In contrast, the activity of the AEA synthetase and the binding efficiency of vanilloid receptor were not affected by the differentiation process. In addition, we demonstrate that AEA increases by approximately twofold insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in differentiated adipocytes, according to a CB1R-dependent mechanism that involves nitric oxide synthase, but not lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase. We also show that AEA binding to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, known to induce differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts into adipocytes, is not involved in the stimulation of glucose uptake.

Journal

Cellular and Molecular Life SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 22, 2006

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