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Elections and Democratization in the Middle EastMorocco’s “spring”: The Monarchical Advantage and Electoral Futility

Elections and Democratization in the Middle East: Morocco’s “spring”: The Monarchical Advantage... [The uprisings sweeping the Middle East and North Africa are effectively changing the political landscape in the region. But while some countries are undergoing popular social changes, some will not see the same social revolutionary impulse. While the so-called Arab spring has so far toppled despotic regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, and mounted serious challenges to authoritarian regimes in Syria and Yemen. Algeria’s entrenched bureaucratic-cum-military authoritarian system has proved resilient. In Morocco, the monarchy still appears popular with most Moroccans. Where Tunisians, Egyptians, Yemenis, Syrians, and Libyans called for regime changes in their political systems, Morocco’s protesters have called on the king to reform the political system, sack the government, and fight corruption. This reality points to a sizeable monarchical popularity.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Elections and Democratization in the Middle EastMorocco’s “spring”: The Monarchical Advantage and Electoral Futility

Part of the Elections, Voting, Technology Book Series
Editors: Hamad, Mahmoud; al-Anani, Khalil

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References (10)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2014
ISBN
978-1-349-45262-0
Pages
89 –107
DOI
10.1057/9781137299253_5
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The uprisings sweeping the Middle East and North Africa are effectively changing the political landscape in the region. But while some countries are undergoing popular social changes, some will not see the same social revolutionary impulse. While the so-called Arab spring has so far toppled despotic regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, and mounted serious challenges to authoritarian regimes in Syria and Yemen. Algeria’s entrenched bureaucratic-cum-military authoritarian system has proved resilient. In Morocco, the monarchy still appears popular with most Moroccans. Where Tunisians, Egyptians, Yemenis, Syrians, and Libyans called for regime changes in their political systems, Morocco’s protesters have called on the king to reform the political system, sack the government, and fight corruption. This reality points to a sizeable monarchical popularity.]

Published: Nov 25, 2015

Keywords: Arab World; Regime Type; Authoritarian Rule; Constitutional Reform; Protest Movement

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