Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Elections and Democratization in the Middle EastElections and Beyond: Democratization, Democratic Consolidation, or What?

Elections and Democratization in the Middle East: Elections and Beyond: Democratization,... [It was once noted correctly that “there are two predictable, and nearly always mistaken, responses to any great international upheaval: one to say that everything has changed; the other is to say that nothing has changed.”1 Many expected in the euphoria that followed the Arab Spring a quick and relatively easy democratic transformation. Followers of this logic maintained that jettisoning the overbearing leviathans was the hardest step in the democratization process and anything else would be relatively easier. Focusing on the enduring legacy of authoritarianism and the increasing economic, social, and sectarian difficulties, others expressed grave doubts about the ability of Arab institutions and masses to satisfy the conditions of democratic transition and move toward democratic consolidation. At least in the short run neither scenario seems to be accurate. Emerging political systems are embarking on political transition that may or may not reach democratic consolidation.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Elections and Democratization in the Middle EastElections and Beyond: Democratization, Democratic Consolidation, or What?

Part of the Elections, Voting, Technology Book Series
Editors: Hamad, Mahmoud; al-Anani, Khalil

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/elections-and-democratization-in-the-middle-east-elections-and-beyond-23vgxBxwAB

References (13)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2014
ISBN
978-1-349-45262-0
Pages
203 –221
DOI
10.1057/9781137299253_10
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[It was once noted correctly that “there are two predictable, and nearly always mistaken, responses to any great international upheaval: one to say that everything has changed; the other is to say that nothing has changed.”1 Many expected in the euphoria that followed the Arab Spring a quick and relatively easy democratic transformation. Followers of this logic maintained that jettisoning the overbearing leviathans was the hardest step in the democratization process and anything else would be relatively easier. Focusing on the enduring legacy of authoritarianism and the increasing economic, social, and sectarian difficulties, others expressed grave doubts about the ability of Arab institutions and masses to satisfy the conditions of democratic transition and move toward democratic consolidation. At least in the short run neither scenario seems to be accurate. Emerging political systems are embarking on political transition that may or may not reach democratic consolidation.]

Published: Nov 25, 2015

Keywords: Middle East; Comparative International Development; Arab World; Democratic Transition; Political Skill

There are no references for this article.