Effects of nicotine gum on repeated administration of the stroop test

Effects of nicotine gum on repeated administration of the stroop test 213 104 104 4 4 Stephen C. Provost Ros Woodward Department of Psychology Australian National University P.O. Box 4 2601 Canberra ACT Australia School of Behavioural Sciences Macquarie University 2109 NSW Australia National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health Australian National University P.O. Box 4 2601 Canberra ACT Australia Abstract Using a double-blind procedure, 24 non-smoking subjects chewed either 2 mg nicorette® gum or a placebo for 20 min, before completing a Stroop test on three occasions. Colour-word reading and simple colour naming times were consistent across repeats, and were unaffected by nicotine. However, the time taken to name the colour of incongruous colour word stimuli declined across trials. This increase in speed across repeats was significantly greater in those subjects who had received nicotine. These data are consistent with previous reports of a decreased Stroop effect following nicotine administration, but are not compatible with a simple model which assumes that nicotine alters the way in which information is filtered by selective attentional mechanisms. The present results can be explained by postulating that nicotine influences either the rate at which colour naming become more automatic, or changes the way in which resources are allocated to non-automatic processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Effects of nicotine gum on repeated administration of the stroop test

Psychopharmacology, Volume 104 (4) – Aug 1, 1991

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF02245662
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 104 104 4 4 Stephen C. Provost Ros Woodward Department of Psychology Australian National University P.O. Box 4 2601 Canberra ACT Australia School of Behavioural Sciences Macquarie University 2109 NSW Australia National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health Australian National University P.O. Box 4 2601 Canberra ACT Australia Abstract Using a double-blind procedure, 24 non-smoking subjects chewed either 2 mg nicorette® gum or a placebo for 20 min, before completing a Stroop test on three occasions. Colour-word reading and simple colour naming times were consistent across repeats, and were unaffected by nicotine. However, the time taken to name the colour of incongruous colour word stimuli declined across trials. This increase in speed across repeats was significantly greater in those subjects who had received nicotine. These data are consistent with previous reports of a decreased Stroop effect following nicotine administration, but are not compatible with a simple model which assumes that nicotine alters the way in which information is filtered by selective attentional mechanisms. The present results can be explained by postulating that nicotine influences either the rate at which colour naming become more automatic, or changes the way in which resources are allocated to non-automatic processes.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 1991

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