Effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on species richness: evidence from biogeographic patterns

Effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on species richness: evidence from biogeographic... Habitat subdivision by geography or human activity may be an important determinant of regional species richness. Cumulative species-area relationships for vertebrates, land plants, and insects on island archipelagoes show that collections of small islands generally harbor more species than comparable areas composed of one or a few large islands. The effect of the degree of habitat subdivision in increasing species richness appears to increase with the distance from potential sources of colonists. Mountaintop biotas show no clear differences between species richness on large alpine areas and collections of smaller peaks. National park faunas generally have more species in collections of small parks than in the larger parks. In all cases where a consistent effect of subdivision is observed, the more subdivided collection of islands or isolates contains more species. To the degree that these data provide guidance for establishing nature reserves, they suggest that increasing the numbers of reserves may be an important component of conservation strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on species richness: evidence from biogeographic patterns

Oecologia, Volume 75 (1) – Feb 1, 1988

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00378826
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Habitat subdivision by geography or human activity may be an important determinant of regional species richness. Cumulative species-area relationships for vertebrates, land plants, and insects on island archipelagoes show that collections of small islands generally harbor more species than comparable areas composed of one or a few large islands. The effect of the degree of habitat subdivision in increasing species richness appears to increase with the distance from potential sources of colonists. Mountaintop biotas show no clear differences between species richness on large alpine areas and collections of smaller peaks. National park faunas generally have more species in collections of small parks than in the larger parks. In all cases where a consistent effect of subdivision is observed, the more subdivided collection of islands or isolates contains more species. To the degree that these data provide guidance for establishing nature reserves, they suggest that increasing the numbers of reserves may be an important component of conservation strategies.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 1988

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