Effect of temperature on laboratory growth, reproduction and life span of Octopus bimaculoides

Effect of temperature on laboratory growth, reproduction and life span of Octopus bimaculoides 227 98 98 3 3 J. W. Forsythe R. T. Hanlon The University of Texas Medical Branch The Marine Biomedical Institute 200 University Boulevard 77550-2772 Galveston Texas USA Abstract Laboratory culture of 40 Octopus bimaculoides from April 1982 to August 1983 through the full life cycle at 18°C vs 23°C provided information on the growth, reproductive biology and life span of this California littoral octopus. At 18°C, the cephalopods grew from a hatchling size of 0.07 g to a mean of 619 g in 404 d; the largest individual was 872 g. Octopuses cultured at 23°C reached their highest mean weight of 597 g in 370 d; the largest individual grown at this temperature was 848 g after 404 d. Growth data revealed a two-phase growth pattern: a 5 mo exponential phase followed by a slower logarithmic (power function) phase until spawning. At 5 mo octopuses grown at 23°C were over three times larger than their 18°C siblings. However, beyond 6.5 mo, growth rates were no higher at 23°C than at 18°C. At 13.5 mo, the mean weight of the 18°C group surpassed that of the 23°C group. The slope of the length/weight (L/W) relationship was significantly different for the two temperature regimes, with the 23°C octopuses weighing 18% less than their 18°C siblings at a mantle length of 100 mm. Females weighed more than males at any given mantle length. Males grew slightly larger and matured before females. The L/W relationship indicated isometric body growth throughout the life cycle. Higher temperature accelerated all aspects of reproductive biology and shortened life span by as much as 20% (from approximately 16 to 13 mo). O. bimaculoides has one of the longest life cycles among species with large eggs and benthic hatchlings. Extrapolations to field growth are made, and the possible effects of temperature anomalies such as El Niño are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

Effect of temperature on laboratory growth, reproduction and life span of Octopus bimaculoides

Marine Biology, Volume 98 (3) – Jun 1, 1988

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biomedicine general; Oceanography; Ecology; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00391113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

227 98 98 3 3 J. W. Forsythe R. T. Hanlon The University of Texas Medical Branch The Marine Biomedical Institute 200 University Boulevard 77550-2772 Galveston Texas USA Abstract Laboratory culture of 40 Octopus bimaculoides from April 1982 to August 1983 through the full life cycle at 18°C vs 23°C provided information on the growth, reproductive biology and life span of this California littoral octopus. At 18°C, the cephalopods grew from a hatchling size of 0.07 g to a mean of 619 g in 404 d; the largest individual was 872 g. Octopuses cultured at 23°C reached their highest mean weight of 597 g in 370 d; the largest individual grown at this temperature was 848 g after 404 d. Growth data revealed a two-phase growth pattern: a 5 mo exponential phase followed by a slower logarithmic (power function) phase until spawning. At 5 mo octopuses grown at 23°C were over three times larger than their 18°C siblings. However, beyond 6.5 mo, growth rates were no higher at 23°C than at 18°C. At 13.5 mo, the mean weight of the 18°C group surpassed that of the 23°C group. The slope of the length/weight (L/W) relationship was significantly different for the two temperature regimes, with the 23°C octopuses weighing 18% less than their 18°C siblings at a mantle length of 100 mm. Females weighed more than males at any given mantle length. Males grew slightly larger and matured before females. The L/W relationship indicated isometric body growth throughout the life cycle. Higher temperature accelerated all aspects of reproductive biology and shortened life span by as much as 20% (from approximately 16 to 13 mo). O. bimaculoides has one of the longest life cycles among species with large eggs and benthic hatchlings. Extrapolations to field growth are made, and the possible effects of temperature anomalies such as El Niño are discussed.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1988

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