Ecological corridors also operate in an urban matrix: A test case with garden shrews

Ecological corridors also operate in an urban matrix: A test case with garden shrews The fragmentation of landscapes, induced by the growing urbanisation, is a major cause of biodiversity loss. Ecological corridors are landscape elements that make up for the negative effects of habitat fragmentation in agricultural or natural landscapes. However, their effectiveness have been rarely assess in an urban context. To do so, we analysed shrews in woodlots, corridors and domestic gardens that are connected or disconnected from a corridor. Indeed, these mammals are very sensitive to fragmentation and could play an important ecological role even in small and isolated areas such as domestic gardens. Ninety-seven shrews, from three species were trapped. In our study, Sorex coronatus, Sorex minutus and Crocidura russula were not widely distributed and mainly occurred in woodlots, corridors and connected gardens. In gardens, shrew occurrences were mainly determined by landscape configuration with negative effects of the distance to the corridor and the distance to the woodlot, stronger for C.russula than Sorex species. At the local scale, garden management and vegetation showed a positive effect mainly for Sorex species. The quality of gardens seems good enough to permit the co-occurrence of several species of shrews and thus competition was not identified as a major process for determining the occurrence. We showed that, as in other ecosystems, ecological corridors in urban context can play an effective role for the distribution of organisms with low dispersal capabilities and should be develop in planning strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Ecosystems Springer Journals

Ecological corridors also operate in an urban matrix: A test case with garden shrews

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Urban Ecology; Environmental Management; Ecology; Nature Conservation
ISSN
1083-8155
eISSN
1573-1642
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11252-013-0289-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The fragmentation of landscapes, induced by the growing urbanisation, is a major cause of biodiversity loss. Ecological corridors are landscape elements that make up for the negative effects of habitat fragmentation in agricultural or natural landscapes. However, their effectiveness have been rarely assess in an urban context. To do so, we analysed shrews in woodlots, corridors and domestic gardens that are connected or disconnected from a corridor. Indeed, these mammals are very sensitive to fragmentation and could play an important ecological role even in small and isolated areas such as domestic gardens. Ninety-seven shrews, from three species were trapped. In our study, Sorex coronatus, Sorex minutus and Crocidura russula were not widely distributed and mainly occurred in woodlots, corridors and connected gardens. In gardens, shrew occurrences were mainly determined by landscape configuration with negative effects of the distance to the corridor and the distance to the woodlot, stronger for C.russula than Sorex species. At the local scale, garden management and vegetation showed a positive effect mainly for Sorex species. The quality of gardens seems good enough to permit the co-occurrence of several species of shrews and thus competition was not identified as a major process for determining the occurrence. We showed that, as in other ecosystems, ecological corridors in urban context can play an effective role for the distribution of organisms with low dispersal capabilities and should be develop in planning strategies.

Journal

Urban EcosystemsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 23, 2013

References

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