Do larger cephalopods live longer? Effects of temperature and phylogeny on interspecific comparisons of age and size at maturity

Do larger cephalopods live longer? Effects of temperature and phylogeny on interspecific... The relationship between size and age at maturity in cephalopods is unresolved. The most recent interspecific comparison of size and age of cephalopods contradicts two previous studies by concluding that larger species do not live longer. This paper addresses the confounding effects of temperature and phylogeny while answering the question, “Do larger cephalopods live longer?”. To test this hypothesis, life-history data from 18 species of cephalopods, from five orders, with sizes at maturity spanning five orders of magnitude, were obtained from the literature. Without temperature consideration and with Nautilus spp. included in the sample, regression analysis suggests (r 2 = 0.376, p = 0.007) that larger cephalopods take longer to reach maturity. Once temperature was controlled by using physiological time (degree-days), the coleoid cephalopods moved closer to the best fit line and the genus Nautilus became an outlier. When Nautilus was removed and time measured in degree-days, the relationship was very strong (r 2 = 0.785, p < 0.001). We conclude that coleoid cephalopods achieve larger size by delaying maturity and that temperature, as well as phylogeny, must be considered when making interspecific comparisons. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

Do larger cephalopods live longer? Effects of temperature and phylogeny on interspecific comparisons of age and size at maturity

Marine Biology, Volume 136 (1) – Jan 18, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Environment; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
D.O.I.
10.1007/s002270050012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between size and age at maturity in cephalopods is unresolved. The most recent interspecific comparison of size and age of cephalopods contradicts two previous studies by concluding that larger species do not live longer. This paper addresses the confounding effects of temperature and phylogeny while answering the question, “Do larger cephalopods live longer?”. To test this hypothesis, life-history data from 18 species of cephalopods, from five orders, with sizes at maturity spanning five orders of magnitude, were obtained from the literature. Without temperature consideration and with Nautilus spp. included in the sample, regression analysis suggests (r 2 = 0.376, p = 0.007) that larger cephalopods take longer to reach maturity. Once temperature was controlled by using physiological time (degree-days), the coleoid cephalopods moved closer to the best fit line and the genus Nautilus became an outlier. When Nautilus was removed and time measured in degree-days, the relationship was very strong (r 2 = 0.785, p < 0.001). We conclude that coleoid cephalopods achieve larger size by delaying maturity and that temperature, as well as phylogeny, must be considered when making interspecific comparisons.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 18, 2000

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