DNA fingerprints of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus : a population comparison

DNA fingerprints of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus : a population comparison 227 113 113 4 4 C. S. Baker M. MacCarthy P. J. Smith A. P. Perry G. K. Chambers School of Biological Sciences Victoria University P.O. Box 600 Wellington New Zealand Marine Research Centre Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries P.O. Box 297 Wellington New Zealand Abstract Genetic variability among Hoplostethus atlanticus collected from two spawning grounds east and west of New Zealand was examined using DNA fingerprints as revealed by hybridization with three clonal probes: 33.15, M13 and 3′HVR. The 33.15 and 3′HVR fingerprints revealed a complex pattern of restriction fragments, apparently refecting a multi-locus system of highly variable minisatellite alleles similar to the pattern of alleles reported in other vertebrates. The M13 fingerprints revealed a distinct pattern of restriction fragments of high molecular weight, reflecting a single-locus system that overlapped with the family of minisatellite alleles observed in 33.15 fingerprints. In a sample of 12 orange roughy collected on a single regional spawning site, the average percent similarity of 33.15 fingerprints was 21.15% (SD=17.75), the average percent similarity of 3′HVR fingerprints was 14.32% (SD=14.45) and the inferred average allelic frequency of the M13 single-locus system was 0.071. A comparison of 33.15 and M13 fingerprints from two distant spawning sites ground New Zealand revealed no obvious regional differences. The variability of orange roughy fingerprints was so great, however, that regional comparisons could not be considered conclusive indicators of genetic identity. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the power and pitfalls of using DNA-level markers for the population analysis of marine fish. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

DNA fingerprints of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus : a population comparison

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biomedicine general; Oceanography; Ecology; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
DOI
10.1007/BF00349699
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

227 113 113 4 4 C. S. Baker M. MacCarthy P. J. Smith A. P. Perry G. K. Chambers School of Biological Sciences Victoria University P.O. Box 600 Wellington New Zealand Marine Research Centre Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries P.O. Box 297 Wellington New Zealand Abstract Genetic variability among Hoplostethus atlanticus collected from two spawning grounds east and west of New Zealand was examined using DNA fingerprints as revealed by hybridization with three clonal probes: 33.15, M13 and 3′HVR. The 33.15 and 3′HVR fingerprints revealed a complex pattern of restriction fragments, apparently refecting a multi-locus system of highly variable minisatellite alleles similar to the pattern of alleles reported in other vertebrates. The M13 fingerprints revealed a distinct pattern of restriction fragments of high molecular weight, reflecting a single-locus system that overlapped with the family of minisatellite alleles observed in 33.15 fingerprints. In a sample of 12 orange roughy collected on a single regional spawning site, the average percent similarity of 33.15 fingerprints was 21.15% (SD=17.75), the average percent similarity of 3′HVR fingerprints was 14.32% (SD=14.45) and the inferred average allelic frequency of the M13 single-locus system was 0.071. A comparison of 33.15 and M13 fingerprints from two distant spawning sites ground New Zealand revealed no obvious regional differences. The variability of orange roughy fingerprints was so great, however, that regional comparisons could not be considered conclusive indicators of genetic identity. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the power and pitfalls of using DNA-level markers for the population analysis of marine fish.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 1992

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