Direct and indirect effects of climate change on St John's wort, Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae)

Direct and indirect effects of climate change on St John's wort, Hypericum perforatum L.... We report results from a continuing, long-term field experiment addressing biotic responses to climatic change in grasslands. We focus on effects of summer precipitation (enhanced rainfall, drought, control) and winter ground temperatures (warming, control) on growth, reproduction and herbivory in St John's wort, Hypericum perforatum L. Both winter warming and summer rainfall regimes modified performance and interactions of H. perforatum, particularly those with herbivorous insects. Winter warming had positive effects, with earlier initiation of plant growth and reduced damage by gall-forming and sucking insects in spring, but also had strong negative effects on plant height, flowering, and reproduction. Summer drought reduced reproductive success, but even severe drought did not affect plant growth or flowering success directly. Rather, summer drought acted indirectly by modifying interactions with herbivorous insects via increased vulnerability of the plants to herbivory on flowers and capsules. Overall, the effects of summer precipitation were expressed mainly through interactions that altered the responses to increased winter temperatures, particularly as summer drought increased. The field site, in Oxfordshire, UK, is near the northern limit of distribution of the species, and the experiment tested probable responses of H. perforatum as climates shift towards those more typical of the current center of the distribution of the species. However, if climates do change according to the projected scenarios, then H. perforatum is unlikely to fare well near its northern boundary. Increased winter temperatures, particularly if accompanied by increased summer drought, will probably render this species even less abundant in England than at present. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Direct and indirect effects of climate change on St John's wort, Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/direct-and-indirect-effects-of-climate-change-on-st-john-s-wort-0zMOREq0PY
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences; Hydrology/Water Resources
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/s004420050839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We report results from a continuing, long-term field experiment addressing biotic responses to climatic change in grasslands. We focus on effects of summer precipitation (enhanced rainfall, drought, control) and winter ground temperatures (warming, control) on growth, reproduction and herbivory in St John's wort, Hypericum perforatum L. Both winter warming and summer rainfall regimes modified performance and interactions of H. perforatum, particularly those with herbivorous insects. Winter warming had positive effects, with earlier initiation of plant growth and reduced damage by gall-forming and sucking insects in spring, but also had strong negative effects on plant height, flowering, and reproduction. Summer drought reduced reproductive success, but even severe drought did not affect plant growth or flowering success directly. Rather, summer drought acted indirectly by modifying interactions with herbivorous insects via increased vulnerability of the plants to herbivory on flowers and capsules. Overall, the effects of summer precipitation were expressed mainly through interactions that altered the responses to increased winter temperatures, particularly as summer drought increased. The field site, in Oxfordshire, UK, is near the northern limit of distribution of the species, and the experiment tested probable responses of H. perforatum as climates shift towards those more typical of the current center of the distribution of the species. However, if climates do change according to the projected scenarios, then H. perforatum is unlikely to fare well near its northern boundary. Increased winter temperatures, particularly if accompanied by increased summer drought, will probably render this species even less abundant in England than at present.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 19, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off