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Digital Signal Processing in Radio Receivers and Transmitters

Digital Signal Processing in Radio Receivers and Transmitters The interface between analog and digital signalprocessing paths in radio receivers and transmitters issteadily migrating toward the antenna as engineers learnto combine the unique attributes and capabilities of DSP with those of traditional communicationsystem designs to achieve systems with superior andbroadened capabilities while reducing system cost.Digital signal processing (DSP) techniques are rapidly being applied to many signal conditioning andsignal processing tasks traditionally performed byanalog components and subsystems in RF communicationreceivers and transmitters [1-4]. The incentive toreplace analog implementations of signal processingfunctions with DSP-based processing includes reducedcost, enhanced performance, improved reliability, easeof manufacturing and maintenance, and operatingflexibility and configurability [5]. Technologies thatfacilitate cost-effective DSP-based implementationsinclude a very large market base supportinghigh-performance programmable signal processing chips[6], field programmable gate arrays (FPGA),application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), andhigh-performance analog-to-digital and digital-to-analogconverters (ADC and DAC respectively) [7]. The optimumpoint for inserting DSP in a signal processing chainis determined by matching the system performancerequirements to bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio(i.e., speed and precision) limitations of the signal processors and the signal converters. In thispaper we review how clever algorithmic structuresinteract with DSP hardware to extend the range andperformance of DSP-based processing in RF transmitters and receivers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Wireless Information Networks Springer Journals

Digital Signal Processing in Radio Receivers and Transmitters

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Engineering; Electrical Engineering
ISSN
1068-9605
eISSN
1572-8129
DOI
10.1023/A:1018817502812
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The interface between analog and digital signalprocessing paths in radio receivers and transmitters issteadily migrating toward the antenna as engineers learnto combine the unique attributes and capabilities of DSP with those of traditional communicationsystem designs to achieve systems with superior andbroadened capabilities while reducing system cost.Digital signal processing (DSP) techniques are rapidly being applied to many signal conditioning andsignal processing tasks traditionally performed byanalog components and subsystems in RF communicationreceivers and transmitters [1-4]. The incentive toreplace analog implementations of signal processingfunctions with DSP-based processing includes reducedcost, enhanced performance, improved reliability, easeof manufacturing and maintenance, and operatingflexibility and configurability [5]. Technologies thatfacilitate cost-effective DSP-based implementationsinclude a very large market base supportinghigh-performance programmable signal processing chips[6], field programmable gate arrays (FPGA),application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), andhigh-performance analog-to-digital and digital-to-analogconverters (ADC and DAC respectively) [7]. The optimumpoint for inserting DSP in a signal processing chainis determined by matching the system performancerequirements to bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio(i.e., speed and precision) limitations of the signal processors and the signal converters. In thispaper we review how clever algorithmic structuresinteract with DSP hardware to extend the range andperformance of DSP-based processing in RF transmitters and receivers.

Journal

International Journal of Wireless Information NetworksSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 24, 2004

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