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Desegregating Chicago’s Public SchoolsRedmond’s School Desegregation Plan and Reactions

Desegregating Chicago’s Public Schools: Redmond’s School Desegregation Plan and Reactions [At first appearance James Redmond may not have seemed all that different from the previous Chicago superintendent Benjamin Willis, whom Redmond replaced in 1966. Both were older, white, clean-shaven men with neatly trimmed hair. But Redmond’s entrance into the superintendent’s office marked a symbolic shift in the handling of the city’s schools—at least in regard to the city’s image of desegregation. While Willis had been praised for increasing resources in some of the city’s schools, his record regarding desegregation and the inequalities between black and white schools had come under vehement public attack. As black schools became increasingly overcrowded, Willis merely responded by installing mobile units, which his critics called “Willis Wagons.” Willis had stubbornly maintained that outcries regarding desegregation and inequality were unwarranted—despite federal reports that acknowledged such inequalities.1 Redmond replaced Willis upon Willis’s retirement in 1966 giving civil rights activists high expectations for the city’s desegregation efforts.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Desegregating Chicago’s Public SchoolsRedmond’s School Desegregation Plan and Reactions

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2014
ISBN
978-1-349-47210-9
Pages
19 –55
DOI
10.1057/9781137357588_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[At first appearance James Redmond may not have seemed all that different from the previous Chicago superintendent Benjamin Willis, whom Redmond replaced in 1966. Both were older, white, clean-shaven men with neatly trimmed hair. But Redmond’s entrance into the superintendent’s office marked a symbolic shift in the handling of the city’s schools—at least in regard to the city’s image of desegregation. While Willis had been praised for increasing resources in some of the city’s schools, his record regarding desegregation and the inequalities between black and white schools had come under vehement public attack. As black schools became increasingly overcrowded, Willis merely responded by installing mobile units, which his critics called “Willis Wagons.” Willis had stubbornly maintained that outcries regarding desegregation and inequality were unwarranted—despite federal reports that acknowledged such inequalities.1 Redmond replaced Willis upon Willis’s retirement in 1966 giving civil rights activists high expectations for the city’s desegregation efforts.]

Published: Oct 29, 2015

Keywords: Board Member; Quality Education; Black Student; Neighborhood School; School Desegregation

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