Defective habituation to nociceptive stimulation in alcohol-avoiding ANA rats

Defective habituation to nociceptive stimulation in alcohol-avoiding ANA rats 213 120 120 1 1 A. Honkanen T. Ovaska E. R. Korpi Department of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology University of Helsinki POB 15 FIN-00014 Helsinki Finland Biomedical Research Center Alko Group Ltd P.O. Box 350 FIN-00101 Helsinki Finland Abstract Brain opioidergic mechanisms participate in the regulation of motivational and ingestive behaviours. Since alcohol is believed to activate endogenous opioid systems and to produce opioid-mediated antinociception, the present experiments were performed to find out if alcohol-induced antinociception differs between the alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rat lines. Alcohol doses relevant to the voluntary alcohol intake by the AA rats (0.5–1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) failed to alter tail-flick (TF) latency in a 55°C water bath by either rat line. However, repeated measurement of TF latency, even without any alcohol treatment, prolonged tail-flick latencies in AA but not in ANA rats. Prolongation of TF latency was also seen in non-selected Wistar rats, indicating that the ANA rats respond abnormally in this test. The antinociceptive effects of swimming-induced stress (3 min at 15°C) and those of cumulative morphine administration (0.5–16.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) were similar in both rat lines. Using higher, motor-impairing alcohol doses with repeated baseline TF determinations, it was observed that a dose of 1.5 g/kg induced slight antinociception only in the AA rats, while 2.0 g/kg produced similar effects in both rat lines. It is thus concluded that the alcohol-preferring AA rats do not show any enhanced alcohol-induced antinociception at relevant alcohol doses. However, the alcohol-avoiding ANA rats appear to have a defective ability to habituate to repeated sensory stimuli, which could contribute to their alcohol avoidance by preventing the development of tolerance to aversive effects of alcohol. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Defective habituation to nociceptive stimulation in alcohol-avoiding ANA rats

Psychopharmacology, Volume 120 (1) – Jul 1, 1995

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF02246141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 120 120 1 1 A. Honkanen T. Ovaska E. R. Korpi Department of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology University of Helsinki POB 15 FIN-00014 Helsinki Finland Biomedical Research Center Alko Group Ltd P.O. Box 350 FIN-00101 Helsinki Finland Abstract Brain opioidergic mechanisms participate in the regulation of motivational and ingestive behaviours. Since alcohol is believed to activate endogenous opioid systems and to produce opioid-mediated antinociception, the present experiments were performed to find out if alcohol-induced antinociception differs between the alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rat lines. Alcohol doses relevant to the voluntary alcohol intake by the AA rats (0.5–1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) failed to alter tail-flick (TF) latency in a 55°C water bath by either rat line. However, repeated measurement of TF latency, even without any alcohol treatment, prolonged tail-flick latencies in AA but not in ANA rats. Prolongation of TF latency was also seen in non-selected Wistar rats, indicating that the ANA rats respond abnormally in this test. The antinociceptive effects of swimming-induced stress (3 min at 15°C) and those of cumulative morphine administration (0.5–16.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) were similar in both rat lines. Using higher, motor-impairing alcohol doses with repeated baseline TF determinations, it was observed that a dose of 1.5 g/kg induced slight antinociception only in the AA rats, while 2.0 g/kg produced similar effects in both rat lines. It is thus concluded that the alcohol-preferring AA rats do not show any enhanced alcohol-induced antinociception at relevant alcohol doses. However, the alcohol-avoiding ANA rats appear to have a defective ability to habituate to repeated sensory stimuli, which could contribute to their alcohol avoidance by preventing the development of tolerance to aversive effects of alcohol.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 1995

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