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Cross-cultural competence in international business: toward a definition and a model

Cross-cultural competence in international business: toward a definition and a model Many international business failures have been ascribed to a lack of cross-cultural competence (CC) on the part of business practitioners. However, the international business literature appears to lack an adequate conceptualization and definition of the term ‘CC’, focusing instead on the knowledge, skills and attributes that appear to be its antecedents. In this conceptual study, we propose a definition of CC as it applies to international business and develop a model for understanding how CC is nurtured in individuals, linking our definition to the concept of cultural intelligence. We discuss the components of the model and suggest that there are environmental and contextual impediments to the effective application of the requisite skills, knowledge and attributes that have been identified as necessary for CC, resulting in a gap between ‘knowing’ and ‘doing’. We conclude by discussing the implications of the model for practitioners, and by suggesting appropriate directions for further research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of International Business Studies Springer Journals

Cross-cultural competence in international business: toward a definition and a model

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References (88)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Academy of International Business
Subject
Business and Management; Business and Management, general; International Business; Management; Organization; Business Strategy/Leadership
ISSN
0047-2506
eISSN
1478-6990
DOI
10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8400205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many international business failures have been ascribed to a lack of cross-cultural competence (CC) on the part of business practitioners. However, the international business literature appears to lack an adequate conceptualization and definition of the term ‘CC’, focusing instead on the knowledge, skills and attributes that appear to be its antecedents. In this conceptual study, we propose a definition of CC as it applies to international business and develop a model for understanding how CC is nurtured in individuals, linking our definition to the concept of cultural intelligence. We discuss the components of the model and suggest that there are environmental and contextual impediments to the effective application of the requisite skills, knowledge and attributes that have been identified as necessary for CC, resulting in a gap between ‘knowing’ and ‘doing’. We conclude by discussing the implications of the model for practitioners, and by suggesting appropriate directions for further research.

Journal

Journal of International Business StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: May 11, 2006

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