Conservation of upstream regulators of scute on the notum of cyclorraphous Diptera

Conservation of upstream regulators of scute on the notum of cyclorraphous Diptera Bristles on the notum of many cyclorraphous flies are arranged into species-specific stereotyped patterns. Differences in the spatial expression of the proneural gene scute correlate with the positions of bristles in those species looked at so far. However, the examination of a number of genes encoding trans -regulatory factors, such as pannier , stripe , u-shaped , caupolican and wingless , indicates that they are expressed in conserved domains on the prospective notum. This suggests that the function of a trans -regulatory network of genes is relatively unchanged in derived Diptera, and that many differences are likely to be due to changes in cis -regulatory sequences of scute . In contrast, in Anopheles gambiae , a basal species with no stereotyped bristle pattern, the expression patterns of pannier and wingless are not conserved, and expression of AgASH , the Anopheles proneural gene, does not correlate in a similar manner with the bristle pattern. We discuss the possibility that independently acting cis -regulatory sequences at the scute locus may have arisen in the lineage giving rise to cyclorraphous flies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Development Genes and Evolution Springer Journals

Conservation of upstream regulators of scute on the notum of cyclorraphous Diptera

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Cell Biology; Neurosciences
ISSN
0949-944X
eISSN
1432-041X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00427-006-0077-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bristles on the notum of many cyclorraphous flies are arranged into species-specific stereotyped patterns. Differences in the spatial expression of the proneural gene scute correlate with the positions of bristles in those species looked at so far. However, the examination of a number of genes encoding trans -regulatory factors, such as pannier , stripe , u-shaped , caupolican and wingless , indicates that they are expressed in conserved domains on the prospective notum. This suggests that the function of a trans -regulatory network of genes is relatively unchanged in derived Diptera, and that many differences are likely to be due to changes in cis -regulatory sequences of scute . In contrast, in Anopheles gambiae , a basal species with no stereotyped bristle pattern, the expression patterns of pannier and wingless are not conserved, and expression of AgASH , the Anopheles proneural gene, does not correlate in a similar manner with the bristle pattern. We discuss the possibility that independently acting cis -regulatory sequences at the scute locus may have arisen in the lineage giving rise to cyclorraphous flies.

Journal

Development Genes and EvolutionSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2006

References

  • How to pattern an epithelium: lessons from achaete – scute regulation on the notum of Drosophila
    Calleja, M; Renaud, O; Usui, K; Pistillo, D; Morata, G; Simpson, P
  • Development of the indirect flight muscle attachment sites in Drosophila : role of the PS integrins and the stripe gene
    Fernandes, JJ; Celniker, SE; VijayRaghavan, K
  • A genetic analysis of pannier , a gene necessary for viability of dorsal tissues and bristle positioning in Drosophila
    Heitzler, P; Haenlin, M; Ramain, P; Calleja, M; Simpson, P
  • A conserved trans -regulatory landscape for scute expression on the notum of cyclorraphous Diptera
    Richardson, J; Simpson, P
  • Mutual exclusion of sensory bristles and tendons on the notum of dipteran flies
    Usui, K; Pistillo, D; Simpson, P

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