Cognitive performance effects of subcutaneous nicotine in smokers and never-smokers

Cognitive performance effects of subcutaneous nicotine in smokers and never-smokers 213 127 127 1 2 Jonathan Foulds John Stapleton John Swettenham Nicholas Bell Kevin McSorley Michael A. H. Russell Health Behaviour Unit, Institute of Psychiatry The Maudsley Hospital Denmark Hill SE5 8AF London UK Department of Addictive Behaviour St. George’s Hospital Medical School Cranmer Terrace SW17 ORE London UK Abstract In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study the effects of two doses of subcutaneous nicotine and saline were compared on a range of performance measures in 18 abstaining smokers and 18 never-smokers. Each subject received two injections (40 min apart) of saline, 0.3 mg nicotine, or 0.6 mg nicotine in a balanced order over three sessions. Performance was assessed before and after the injections on nine tests (news recall, Sternberg memory task, finger tapping, logical reasoning, rapid visual information processing (RVIP), long-term word recognition, digit recall, Stroop test, and critical flicker fusion threshold). In the abstinent smokers, nicotine produced significantly faster correct responses on the logical reasoning test, more target hits, faster reaction times and improved sensitivity on the RVIP task, and more correct responses on word recognition. In never-smokers, nicotine produced faster reaction times on the RVIP and digit-recall tasks, although in the latter case this was at the expense of fewer correct responses. There were no significant differences between the two groups’ responses to nicotine but smokers performed worse than never-smokers prior to injections, even controlling for background characteristics. These results are consistent with other recent research suggesting a primary effect of nicotine in enhancing cognitive performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Cognitive performance effects of subcutaneous nicotine in smokers and never-smokers

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF02805972
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 127 127 1 2 Jonathan Foulds John Stapleton John Swettenham Nicholas Bell Kevin McSorley Michael A. H. Russell Health Behaviour Unit, Institute of Psychiatry The Maudsley Hospital Denmark Hill SE5 8AF London UK Department of Addictive Behaviour St. George’s Hospital Medical School Cranmer Terrace SW17 ORE London UK Abstract In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study the effects of two doses of subcutaneous nicotine and saline were compared on a range of performance measures in 18 abstaining smokers and 18 never-smokers. Each subject received two injections (40 min apart) of saline, 0.3 mg nicotine, or 0.6 mg nicotine in a balanced order over three sessions. Performance was assessed before and after the injections on nine tests (news recall, Sternberg memory task, finger tapping, logical reasoning, rapid visual information processing (RVIP), long-term word recognition, digit recall, Stroop test, and critical flicker fusion threshold). In the abstinent smokers, nicotine produced significantly faster correct responses on the logical reasoning test, more target hits, faster reaction times and improved sensitivity on the RVIP task, and more correct responses on word recognition. In never-smokers, nicotine produced faster reaction times on the RVIP and digit-recall tasks, although in the latter case this was at the expense of fewer correct responses. There were no significant differences between the two groups’ responses to nicotine but smokers performed worse than never-smokers prior to injections, even controlling for background characteristics. These results are consistent with other recent research suggesting a primary effect of nicotine in enhancing cognitive performance.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1996

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