Clinical picture and the treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism

Clinical picture and the treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health problem with an increasing incidence in the last years. Relatively few cases are fatal; most individuals will survive and, in the long-term, the sequalae of TBI will include neuroendocrine dysfunctions with a much higher frequency than previously suspected. Patients who develop hypopituitarism after TBI present manifestations due to the number of deficient hormones, severity of hormonal deficiency, and the duration of hypopituitarism without diagnosis and treatment. The clinical spectrum of hypopituitarism is very large and many signs and symptoms of TBI survivors such as fatigue, concentration difficulties, depressive symptoms are nonspecific and overlap with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and variably severe hypopituitarism related to brain damage remaining undiagnosed. This can explain why the diagnosis of hypopituitarism is often missed or delayed after this condition with potentially serious and hazardous consequences for the affected patients. Moreover, clinical experience cumulatively suggests that TBI-associated hypopituitarism is associated with poor recovery and worse outcome, since post-traumatic hypopituitarism is independently associated with cognitive impairment, poor quality of life, abnormal body composition, and adverse metabolic profile. In the present review, the current data related to clinical consequences of pituitary dysfunction after TBI in adult patients and therapeutic approaches are reported. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pituitary Springer Journals

Clinical picture and the treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/clinical-picture-and-the-treatment-of-tbi-induced-hypopituitarism-DpE4eN31Ih
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
ISSN
1386-341X
eISSN
1573-7403
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11102-019-00956-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health problem with an increasing incidence in the last years. Relatively few cases are fatal; most individuals will survive and, in the long-term, the sequalae of TBI will include neuroendocrine dysfunctions with a much higher frequency than previously suspected. Patients who develop hypopituitarism after TBI present manifestations due to the number of deficient hormones, severity of hormonal deficiency, and the duration of hypopituitarism without diagnosis and treatment. The clinical spectrum of hypopituitarism is very large and many signs and symptoms of TBI survivors such as fatigue, concentration difficulties, depressive symptoms are nonspecific and overlap with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and variably severe hypopituitarism related to brain damage remaining undiagnosed. This can explain why the diagnosis of hypopituitarism is often missed or delayed after this condition with potentially serious and hazardous consequences for the affected patients. Moreover, clinical experience cumulatively suggests that TBI-associated hypopituitarism is associated with poor recovery and worse outcome, since post-traumatic hypopituitarism is independently associated with cognitive impairment, poor quality of life, abnormal body composition, and adverse metabolic profile. In the present review, the current data related to clinical consequences of pituitary dysfunction after TBI in adult patients and therapeutic approaches are reported.

Journal

PituitarySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 30, 2019

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off