Climate and the meristem temperatures of plant communities near the tree-line

Climate and the meristem temperatures of plant communities near the tree-line Temperatures of terminal meristems of forest, krummholz and dwarf shrub vegetation were measured at altitudes of 450, 600, 650 and 850 m in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland. Simultaneously, the air temperature above the vegetation was recorded, so that it was possible to calculate the difference between meristem and air temperature, sometimes called the excess temperature. This temperature increased linearly with the net radiation absorbed at each station, and the slope was dependent on wind speed and the height of the vegetation. In the extreme cases the slopes were practically zero for forest and 0.028° C W -1 m 2 for dwarf shrubs. The latter implies a temperature excess of about 15° C in bright sunshine and low wind speeds. A model is developed to calculate the excess temperature from a knowledge of vegetational height and climatological variables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Climate and the meristem temperatures of plant communities near the tree-line

Oecologia, Volume 79 (2) – May 1, 1989

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00388479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Temperatures of terminal meristems of forest, krummholz and dwarf shrub vegetation were measured at altitudes of 450, 600, 650 and 850 m in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland. Simultaneously, the air temperature above the vegetation was recorded, so that it was possible to calculate the difference between meristem and air temperature, sometimes called the excess temperature. This temperature increased linearly with the net radiation absorbed at each station, and the slope was dependent on wind speed and the height of the vegetation. In the extreme cases the slopes were practically zero for forest and 0.028° C W -1 m 2 for dwarf shrubs. The latter implies a temperature excess of about 15° C in bright sunshine and low wind speeds. A model is developed to calculate the excess temperature from a knowledge of vegetational height and climatological variables.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1989

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