Canopy structure and vertical patterns of photosynthesis and related leaf traits in a deciduous forest

Canopy structure and vertical patterns of photosynthesis and related leaf traits in a deciduous... Canopy structure and light interception were measured in an 18-m tall, closed canopy deciduous forest of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) in southwestern Wisconsin, USA, and related to leaf structural characteristics, N content, and leaf photosynthetic capacity. Light attenuation in the forest occurred primarily in the upper and middle portions of the canopy. Forest stand leaf area index (LAI) and its distribution with respect to canopy height were estimated from canopy transmittance values independently verified with a combined leaf litterfall and point-intersect method. Leaf mass, N and A max per unit area (LMA, N/area and A max /area, respectively) all decreased continuously by over two-fold from the upper to lower canopy, and these traits were strongly correlated with cumulative leaf area above the leaf position in the canopy. In contrast, neither N concentration nor A max per unit mass varied significantly in relation to the vertical canopy gradient. Since leaf N concentration showed no consistent pattern with respect to canopy position, the observed vertical pattern in N/area is a direct consequence of vertical variation of LMA. N/area and LMA were strongly correlated with A max /area among different canopy positions (r 2 =0.81 and r 2 =0.66, respectively), indicating that vertical variation in area-based photosynthetic capacity can also be attributed to variation in LMA. A model of whole-canopy photosynthesis was used to show that observed or hypothetical canopy mass distributions toward higher LMA (and hence higher N/area) in the upper portions of the canopy tended to increase integrated daily canopy photosynthesis over other LMA distribution patterns. Empirical relationships between leaf and canopy-level characteristics may help resolve problems associated with scaling gas exchange measurements made at the leaf level to the individual tree crown and forest canopy-level. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Canopy structure and vertical patterns of photosynthesis and related leaf traits in a deciduous forest

Oecologia, Volume 96 (2) – Nov 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00317729
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Canopy structure and light interception were measured in an 18-m tall, closed canopy deciduous forest of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) in southwestern Wisconsin, USA, and related to leaf structural characteristics, N content, and leaf photosynthetic capacity. Light attenuation in the forest occurred primarily in the upper and middle portions of the canopy. Forest stand leaf area index (LAI) and its distribution with respect to canopy height were estimated from canopy transmittance values independently verified with a combined leaf litterfall and point-intersect method. Leaf mass, N and A max per unit area (LMA, N/area and A max /area, respectively) all decreased continuously by over two-fold from the upper to lower canopy, and these traits were strongly correlated with cumulative leaf area above the leaf position in the canopy. In contrast, neither N concentration nor A max per unit mass varied significantly in relation to the vertical canopy gradient. Since leaf N concentration showed no consistent pattern with respect to canopy position, the observed vertical pattern in N/area is a direct consequence of vertical variation of LMA. N/area and LMA were strongly correlated with A max /area among different canopy positions (r 2 =0.81 and r 2 =0.66, respectively), indicating that vertical variation in area-based photosynthetic capacity can also be attributed to variation in LMA. A model of whole-canopy photosynthesis was used to show that observed or hypothetical canopy mass distributions toward higher LMA (and hence higher N/area) in the upper portions of the canopy tended to increase integrated daily canopy photosynthesis over other LMA distribution patterns. Empirical relationships between leaf and canopy-level characteristics may help resolve problems associated with scaling gas exchange measurements made at the leaf level to the individual tree crown and forest canopy-level.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 1993

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