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Building a collective moral imaginary: Personalist culture and social performance in faith-based community organizing

Building a collective moral imaginary: Personalist culture and social performance in faith-based... This study draws on theories of personalist culture and social performance to explain why organizations in the field of faith-based community organizing are able to effectively engage people in collective action on multiple issues across social difference. Using two qualitative datasets, we document the construction and transformation of personal motivations in interactive social movement settings, and show the importance of this process for mobilizing action in pursuit of a multi-issue social justice agenda. Through cultural practices that construct moral meaning in interactive settings, activists learn to internalize a collective moral imaginary – a cultural schema that affirms the importance of individuals’ personal motivations, links these to those of other people, and situates them within a larger social structure. This expands individuals’ understandings of self and community, and thus frames multi-issue social justice activism organized across social difference as a morally compelling and effective means of pursuing personal interests and motivations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Cultural Sociology Springer Journals

Building a collective moral imaginary: Personalist culture and social performance in faith-based community organizing

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Macmillan Publishers Ltd
Subject
Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general; Sociology, general; Sociology of Culture; Media Sociology
ISSN
2049-7113
eISSN
2049-7121
DOI
10.1057/s41290-017-0029-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study draws on theories of personalist culture and social performance to explain why organizations in the field of faith-based community organizing are able to effectively engage people in collective action on multiple issues across social difference. Using two qualitative datasets, we document the construction and transformation of personal motivations in interactive social movement settings, and show the importance of this process for mobilizing action in pursuit of a multi-issue social justice agenda. Through cultural practices that construct moral meaning in interactive settings, activists learn to internalize a collective moral imaginary – a cultural schema that affirms the importance of individuals’ personal motivations, links these to those of other people, and situates them within a larger social structure. This expands individuals’ understandings of self and community, and thus frames multi-issue social justice activism organized across social difference as a morally compelling and effective means of pursuing personal interests and motivations.

Journal

American Journal of Cultural SociologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2017

References