Benzodiazepines and vigilance performance: a review

Benzodiazepines and vigilance performance: a review 213 98 98 2 2 H. S. Koelega Psychological Laboratory University of Utrecht Sorbonnelaan 16 NL-3584 CA Utrecht The Netherlands Abstract The literature on the effects of anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs on performance in tasks requiring sustained attention is confusing. This review is an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of vigilance tasks in the assessment of adverse effects of benzodiazepines. The long, monotonous, character of these tasks may be more relevant to many tasks performed in everyday life than the short, and often stimulating, tasks commonly employed in test batteries. From 37 available studies, 26 were examined in detail. In young, normal volunteers, vigilance tasks were found to be sensitive, often dose dependently, to the impairing effects of drugs, even in low dose (2.5 mg diazepam). With these subjects the tasks may be successfully used to compare different benzodiazepines with respect to residual activity. Both accuracy and speed of performance appear to be affected. However, in people actually using the drugs (“patients”), adverse effects on performance are usually not found. There is no evidence that benzodiazepines aggravate the vigilance decrement occurring under normal conditions. They do affect overall level of perceptual sensitivity, but show less effects on response criterion. The drugs do not seem to interact with anxiety or sleep quality in their effect on performance, but there are few studies with patients, and the assessment of anziety is not without problems. It is unlikely that impairments in vigilance are simply a byproduct of global, sedative effects, but there is uncertainty regarding measures of general sedation. Developing tolerance with repeated doses has been noted only occasionally, but the opposite of tolerance, aggravated impairment, has also been reported. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Benzodiazepines and vigilance performance: a review

Psychopharmacology, Volume 98 (2) – Jun 1, 1989

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/benzodiazepines-and-vigilance-performance-a-review-mKyKUpn4Ot
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF00444684
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 98 98 2 2 H. S. Koelega Psychological Laboratory University of Utrecht Sorbonnelaan 16 NL-3584 CA Utrecht The Netherlands Abstract The literature on the effects of anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs on performance in tasks requiring sustained attention is confusing. This review is an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of vigilance tasks in the assessment of adverse effects of benzodiazepines. The long, monotonous, character of these tasks may be more relevant to many tasks performed in everyday life than the short, and often stimulating, tasks commonly employed in test batteries. From 37 available studies, 26 were examined in detail. In young, normal volunteers, vigilance tasks were found to be sensitive, often dose dependently, to the impairing effects of drugs, even in low dose (2.5 mg diazepam). With these subjects the tasks may be successfully used to compare different benzodiazepines with respect to residual activity. Both accuracy and speed of performance appear to be affected. However, in people actually using the drugs (“patients”), adverse effects on performance are usually not found. There is no evidence that benzodiazepines aggravate the vigilance decrement occurring under normal conditions. They do affect overall level of perceptual sensitivity, but show less effects on response criterion. The drugs do not seem to interact with anxiety or sleep quality in their effect on performance, but there are few studies with patients, and the assessment of anziety is not without problems. It is unlikely that impairments in vigilance are simply a byproduct of global, sedative effects, but there is uncertainty regarding measures of general sedation. Developing tolerance with repeated doses has been noted only occasionally, but the opposite of tolerance, aggravated impairment, has also been reported.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off