Artificial selection on trichome number in Brassica rapa

Artificial selection on trichome number in Brassica rapa 122 83 83 6 7 J. Ågren D. W. Schemske Department of Botany, KB-15 University of Washington 98195 Seattle WA USA Department of Ecological Botany University of Umeå S-901 87 Umeå Sweden Summary We examined genetic variation for trichome production in a rapid-cycling population of Brassica rapa by conducting a selection experiment and by growing progeny from maternal seed families. Data from the maternal families were also used to estimate the genetic correlations between trichome number and (1) number of days to first flower and (2) flower production. For seven generations, 10% of the plants were selected from low, high and control lines with 100 individuals per line per generation. The number of trichomes on the right edge of the first leaf was 20.8 ± 13.4 (mean + SD; n =100) in the base population, and had by the final generation reached 93.9 ± 28.7 ( n =100) in the high line and 0.9 ±2.6 ( n =100) in the low line. Control line plants of the seventh generation did not differ significantly from base population plants in number of trichomes on the edge. The realized heritability of trichome number on the edge was 0.38 (based on the regression of cumulative response on cumulative selection differential). The divergence between lines in trichome production on the edge of the first leaf was associated with a divergence in trichome number on the petiole and on the top of the same leaf, and on the edge, top and petiole of the third leaf. The increase in trichome production in the high line was further associated with a significant delay in flowering time relative to the control and low lines. The estimated heritabilities of trichome number on the edge and the petiole of the first leaf and of days to first flower were not significantly different from 1.0 (based on the among maternal family component of the total variance). Trichome number on the edge showed a significant genetic correlation with trichome number on the petiole of the first leaf ( r =0.80), and with number of days to first flower ( r =0.31), but not with total flower production ( r =0.17; n =83). The substantial genetic variation for trichome production in B. rapa is of potential value for breeding purposes and also makes B. rapa a convenient system for the study of plant-herbivore interactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png TAG Theoretical and Applied Genetics Springer Journals

Artificial selection on trichome number in Brassica rapa

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biotechnology; Agriculture; Biochemistry, general; Plant Biochemistry; Plant Sciences; Plant Genetics & Genomics
ISSN
0040-5752
eISSN
1432-2242
DOI
10.1007/BF00226683
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

122 83 83 6 7 J. Ågren D. W. Schemske Department of Botany, KB-15 University of Washington 98195 Seattle WA USA Department of Ecological Botany University of Umeå S-901 87 Umeå Sweden Summary We examined genetic variation for trichome production in a rapid-cycling population of Brassica rapa by conducting a selection experiment and by growing progeny from maternal seed families. Data from the maternal families were also used to estimate the genetic correlations between trichome number and (1) number of days to first flower and (2) flower production. For seven generations, 10% of the plants were selected from low, high and control lines with 100 individuals per line per generation. The number of trichomes on the right edge of the first leaf was 20.8 ± 13.4 (mean + SD; n =100) in the base population, and had by the final generation reached 93.9 ± 28.7 ( n =100) in the high line and 0.9 ±2.6 ( n =100) in the low line. Control line plants of the seventh generation did not differ significantly from base population plants in number of trichomes on the edge. The realized heritability of trichome number on the edge was 0.38 (based on the regression of cumulative response on cumulative selection differential). The divergence between lines in trichome production on the edge of the first leaf was associated with a divergence in trichome number on the petiole and on the top of the same leaf, and on the edge, top and petiole of the third leaf. The increase in trichome production in the high line was further associated with a significant delay in flowering time relative to the control and low lines. The estimated heritabilities of trichome number on the edge and the petiole of the first leaf and of days to first flower were not significantly different from 1.0 (based on the among maternal family component of the total variance). Trichome number on the edge showed a significant genetic correlation with trichome number on the petiole of the first leaf ( r =0.80), and with number of days to first flower ( r =0.31), but not with total flower production ( r =0.17; n =83). The substantial genetic variation for trichome production in B. rapa is of potential value for breeding purposes and also makes B. rapa a convenient system for the study of plant-herbivore interactions.

Journal

TAG Theoretical and Applied GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 1992

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