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Artificial Intelligence, Deepfakes and a Future of Ectypes

Artificial Intelligence, Deepfakes and a Future of Ectypes Philos. Technol. (2018) 31:317–321 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-018-0325-3 EDITOR LETTER 1,2 Luciano Floridi Published online: 1 August 2018 Springer Nature B.V. 2018 The art world is full of reproductions. Some are plain replicas, for example the Mona Lisa. Others are fakes or forgeries, like the BVermeers^ painted by Han van Meegeren that sold for $60 million (Kreuger and van Meegeren 2010). The distinction between a replica and a fake is based on the concept of authenticity. Is this artefact what it claims to be? The answer seems simple but, in reality, things are complicated. Today, the paintings of the forger John Myatt are so famous that they are valued at up to $40,000 each, as Bgenuine fakes^ (Furlong 1986). They are not what they say they are, but they are authentically painted by him and not by another forger. And they are beautiful. A bit as if one were to utter a beautiful lie, not any ordinary lie. And an artist like Magritte seems to have painted not only false Picassos and Renoirs during the Nazi occupation of Belgium (Mariën 1983), butalsofakedhisownwork,sotospeak,inthefamous case of the two copies of the painting BTheFlavourofTears^ (1948), both by Magritte, but one of which he passed off http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Artificial Intelligence, Deepfakes and a Future of Ectypes

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 31 (3) – Aug 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Nature B.V.
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-018-0325-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2018) 31:317–321 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-018-0325-3 EDITOR LETTER 1,2 Luciano Floridi Published online: 1 August 2018 Springer Nature B.V. 2018 The art world is full of reproductions. Some are plain replicas, for example the Mona Lisa. Others are fakes or forgeries, like the BVermeers^ painted by Han van Meegeren that sold for $60 million (Kreuger and van Meegeren 2010). The distinction between a replica and a fake is based on the concept of authenticity. Is this artefact what it claims to be? The answer seems simple but, in reality, things are complicated. Today, the paintings of the forger John Myatt are so famous that they are valued at up to $40,000 each, as Bgenuine fakes^ (Furlong 1986). They are not what they say they are, but they are authentically painted by him and not by another forger. And they are beautiful. A bit as if one were to utter a beautiful lie, not any ordinary lie. And an artist like Magritte seems to have painted not only false Picassos and Renoirs during the Nazi occupation of Belgium (Mariën 1983), butalsofakedhisownwork,sotospeak,inthefamous case of the two copies of the painting BTheFlavourofTears^ (1948), both by Magritte, but one of which he passed off

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2018

References