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Annual Report on Urban Development of China 2013Encouraging Farmers to Migrate with Asset

Annual Report on Urban Development of China 2013: Encouraging Farmers to Migrate with Asset [Taking a new approach to urbanization with Chinese characteristics, and putting people first in implementing the Scientific Outlook on Development are both essentially about looking at the means of giving farmers the same treatment as that enjoyed by other registered city residents, achieving the citizenization of farmers, and transforming the social structure. A divided urban-rural social pattern in cities, and rural collective ownership in the countryside are the major features of the China-specific development process with Chinese characteristics, and are also the primary institutional constraints on achieving integrated urban and rural development. On the one hand, in the cities there are institutional obstacles to the citizenization process and to access to the benefits of official residence registration which hinder farmers from migrating into cities. On the other, since it is impossible to clearly define the property rights of rural migrant workers dwelling in cities who still have their rights in their villages of origin, these migrants are unable to effectively dispose of their shares of collectively-owned assets when they leave the countryside, leading to the very complicated legal problem of how to deal with their former land assets. To promote integrated urban and rural development and to accelerate the citizenization of farmers, it is necessary to abolish the urban-rural dual hukou systems, promote the provision of equitable public services in urban and rural areas, find effective ways of developing rural collective economies, and promote reform of the rural property rights system along the lines seen in pilot zones across China, such as in the cities of Chongqing and Chengdu. The current approach to the citizenization of farmers is to let rural migrant workers receive the same treatment as that awarded to native city residents and to let rural people who still practice farming also enjoy urban civilization. Institutional arrangements for the citizenization of farmers need to go beyond the typical city urban-rural divided social pattern and to find effective ways of developing a collective economy, thereby enabling farmers with land assets to migrate into cities to become urban registered city residents who share collectively-owned rural assets.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Annual Report on Urban Development of China 2013Encouraging Farmers to Migrate with Asset

Editors: Pan, Jiahua; Wei, Houkai

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
© Social Sciences Academic Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015
ISBN
978-3-662-46323-9
Pages
195 –214
DOI
10.1007/978-3-662-46324-6_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Taking a new approach to urbanization with Chinese characteristics, and putting people first in implementing the Scientific Outlook on Development are both essentially about looking at the means of giving farmers the same treatment as that enjoyed by other registered city residents, achieving the citizenization of farmers, and transforming the social structure. A divided urban-rural social pattern in cities, and rural collective ownership in the countryside are the major features of the China-specific development process with Chinese characteristics, and are also the primary institutional constraints on achieving integrated urban and rural development. On the one hand, in the cities there are institutional obstacles to the citizenization process and to access to the benefits of official residence registration which hinder farmers from migrating into cities. On the other, since it is impossible to clearly define the property rights of rural migrant workers dwelling in cities who still have their rights in their villages of origin, these migrants are unable to effectively dispose of their shares of collectively-owned assets when they leave the countryside, leading to the very complicated legal problem of how to deal with their former land assets. To promote integrated urban and rural development and to accelerate the citizenization of farmers, it is necessary to abolish the urban-rural dual hukou systems, promote the provision of equitable public services in urban and rural areas, find effective ways of developing rural collective economies, and promote reform of the rural property rights system along the lines seen in pilot zones across China, such as in the cities of Chongqing and Chengdu. The current approach to the citizenization of farmers is to let rural migrant workers receive the same treatment as that awarded to native city residents and to let rural people who still practice farming also enjoy urban civilization. Institutional arrangements for the citizenization of farmers need to go beyond the typical city urban-rural divided social pattern and to find effective ways of developing a collective economy, thereby enabling farmers with land assets to migrate into cities to become urban registered city residents who share collectively-owned rural assets.]

Published: Dec 31, 2014

Keywords: Relevant Authority; Cost Barrier; Hukou System; Rural Property; Village Official

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