Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An Outline of Informational GeneticsA Brief Overview of Molecular Genetics

An Outline of Informational Genetics: A Brief Overview of Molecular Genetics CHAP TER 2 A Brief Overview of Molecular Genetics 2.1 DNA STRUCTURE AND REPLICATION Excellent books popularize molecular genetics, among which I particularly appreciated those by Dawkins [29, 30] for my own initiation to the topic (my background is in engineering). They were especially helpful to me as they provided a neatly defined model. Everybody by now knows that the agent of genetic communication is DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA). It is a very long unidimensional polymer which assumes the form of a double helix. Each strand of the double helix consists of a regular succession of deoxyribose molecules alternating with phosphate groups. Deoxyribose, a sugar, is tied to the phosphate groups by covalent bonds. The deoxyribose–phosphate chain has a mechanical role but does not convey information (it is often metaphorically referred to as the DNA ‘backbone’). One of the four ‘nucleic bases’ (or ‘nucleotides’)— adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C)—is covalently bound to each sugar molecule of the deoxyribose–phosphate chain. The succession of nucleotides according to a well-defined direction along the backbone of one strand constitutes a message written using the four-letter alphabet {A, T, G, C}. The genetic information is borne by this message where the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

An Outline of Informational GeneticsA Brief Overview of Molecular Genetics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/an-outline-of-informational-genetics-a-brief-overview-of-molecular-06xmyKbefc

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2008
ISBN
978-3-031-00501-5
Pages
9 –12
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-01629-5_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAP TER 2 A Brief Overview of Molecular Genetics 2.1 DNA STRUCTURE AND REPLICATION Excellent books popularize molecular genetics, among which I particularly appreciated those by Dawkins [29, 30] for my own initiation to the topic (my background is in engineering). They were especially helpful to me as they provided a neatly defined model. Everybody by now knows that the agent of genetic communication is DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA). It is a very long unidimensional polymer which assumes the form of a double helix. Each strand of the double helix consists of a regular succession of deoxyribose molecules alternating with phosphate groups. Deoxyribose, a sugar, is tied to the phosphate groups by covalent bonds. The deoxyribose–phosphate chain has a mechanical role but does not convey information (it is often metaphorically referred to as the DNA ‘backbone’). One of the four ‘nucleic bases’ (or ‘nucleotides’)— adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C)—is covalently bound to each sugar molecule of the deoxyribose–phosphate chain. The succession of nucleotides according to a well-defined direction along the backbone of one strand constitutes a message written using the four-letter alphabet {A, T, G, C}. The genetic information is borne by this message where the

Published: Jan 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.