Alterations in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in response to 6-hydroxydopamine-induced denervation

Alterations in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in response to... 221 95 95 3 3 Jin G. Sheng Susumu Shirabe Nobuyoshi Nishiyama Joan P. Schwartz Surgical Neurology Branch National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health 20892 Bethesda MD USA Clinical Neuroscience Branch National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health 20892 Bethesda MD USA CNB, NINDS Building 9 Room 1W115 NIH 20892 Bethesda MD USA Abstract Following injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) into one side of the substantia nigra, immunohistochemical studies showed that the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP(+)) astrocytes in the striatum was significantly increased 1 day later and reached a maximum value, with intense immunoreactivity, 4 days after 6-OHDA injection. The number of GFAP(+) cells then gradually declined but was still 1.7 times the control value by 28 days postlesion. GFAP content, determined by immunoblot, and GFAP messenger RNA (mRNA) both reached maximal increases in the striatum 7 days after lesion: the mRNA returned to control values by 28 days, whereas GFAP content remained significantly elevated. Although the increases were all larger on the lesioned side, there were also significant changes on the contralateral side, as well as following saline injection. These results support the hypothesis that products released from damaged neurons are responsible for the induction of reactive gliosis, but cannot distinguish between effects mediated directly on the astrocytes or indirectly via other cells such as the microglia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

Alterations in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in response to 6-hydroxydopamine-induced denervation

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/springer-journals/alterations-in-striatal-glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein-expression-in-z0K4rW2YEE
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00227138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

221 95 95 3 3 Jin G. Sheng Susumu Shirabe Nobuyoshi Nishiyama Joan P. Schwartz Surgical Neurology Branch National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health 20892 Bethesda MD USA Clinical Neuroscience Branch National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health 20892 Bethesda MD USA CNB, NINDS Building 9 Room 1W115 NIH 20892 Bethesda MD USA Abstract Following injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) into one side of the substantia nigra, immunohistochemical studies showed that the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP(+)) astrocytes in the striatum was significantly increased 1 day later and reached a maximum value, with intense immunoreactivity, 4 days after 6-OHDA injection. The number of GFAP(+) cells then gradually declined but was still 1.7 times the control value by 28 days postlesion. GFAP content, determined by immunoblot, and GFAP messenger RNA (mRNA) both reached maximal increases in the striatum 7 days after lesion: the mRNA returned to control values by 28 days, whereas GFAP content remained significantly elevated. Although the increases were all larger on the lesioned side, there were also significant changes on the contralateral side, as well as following saline injection. These results support the hypothesis that products released from damaged neurons are responsible for the induction of reactive gliosis, but cannot distinguish between effects mediated directly on the astrocytes or indirectly via other cells such as the microglia.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 1993

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off