Acquisition of nicotine self-administration in rats: the effects of dose, feeding schedule, and drug contingency

Acquisition of nicotine self-administration in rats: the effects of dose, feeding schedule, and... The studies presented here were designed to further clarify the nature of nicotine self-administration (SA) based on a limited access model in which rats are food restricted, receive operant training using food reinforcement, and are then tested in daily 1-h drug sessions. We examined the effects of dose, feeding schedule, and contingency of drug delivery on acquisition of nicotine SA. Two doses of nicotine bitartrate, 0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg per infusion (free base), supported the transition from food-reinforced to drug-reinforced responding, although the pattern of behavior differed between these doses. In contrast, 0.01 mg/kg per infusion failed to maintain nicotine SA. In a second study, animals were divided into three groups according to feeding schedule. Rats that were both weight restricted and food deprived showed the highest level of SA behavior, although neither food deprivation nor weight restriction was necessary to establish SA. In the third experiment, rats that were switched from food to nicotine as the response-dependent reinforcer maintained higher response rates throughout a 9-day period than animals switched to response-independent (i.e., yoked) nicotine which showed minimal responding after day 1. Furthermore, the differences between self-administering and yoked animals emerged during the first session, suggesting that nicotine may serve as a reinforcer during the first drug exposure in naive animals. These results indicate that acquisition of nicotine SA can be influenced by both dose of nicotine and feeding schedule and that, in animals previously trained on a food-reinforced operant, active lever pressing is maintained only when nicotine delivery is contingent upon responding. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Acquisition of nicotine self-administration in rats: the effects of dose, feeding schedule, and drug contingency

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/acquisition-of-nicotine-self-administration-in-rats-the-effects-of-Rv7fa9eNri
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The studies presented here were designed to further clarify the nature of nicotine self-administration (SA) based on a limited access model in which rats are food restricted, receive operant training using food reinforcement, and are then tested in daily 1-h drug sessions. We examined the effects of dose, feeding schedule, and contingency of drug delivery on acquisition of nicotine SA. Two doses of nicotine bitartrate, 0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg per infusion (free base), supported the transition from food-reinforced to drug-reinforced responding, although the pattern of behavior differed between these doses. In contrast, 0.01 mg/kg per infusion failed to maintain nicotine SA. In a second study, animals were divided into three groups according to feeding schedule. Rats that were both weight restricted and food deprived showed the highest level of SA behavior, although neither food deprivation nor weight restriction was necessary to establish SA. In the third experiment, rats that were switched from food to nicotine as the response-dependent reinforcer maintained higher response rates throughout a 9-day period than animals switched to response-independent (i.e., yoked) nicotine which showed minimal responding after day 1. Furthermore, the differences between self-administering and yoked animals emerged during the first session, suggesting that nicotine may serve as a reinforcer during the first drug exposure in naive animals. These results indicate that acquisition of nicotine SA can be influenced by both dose of nicotine and feeding schedule and that, in animals previously trained on a food-reinforced operant, active lever pressing is maintained only when nicotine delivery is contingent upon responding.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off