Acid–base regulation in the Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister)

Acid–base regulation in the Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister) Homeostatic regulation allows organisms to secure basic physiological processes in a varying environment. To counteract fluctuations in ambient carbonate system speciation due to elevated seawater pCO2 (hypercapnia), many aquatic crustaceans excrete/accumulate acid–base equivalents through their gills; however, not much is known about the role of ammonia in this response. The present study investigated the effects of hypercapnia on acid–base and ammonia regulation in the Dungeness crab, Metacarcinus magister on the whole animal and isolated gill levels. Hemolymph pCO2 and [HCO3 −] increased in M. magister acclimated to elevated pCO2 (330 Pa), while pH remained stable. Additionally, hemolymph [Na+], [Ca2+], and [SO4 2−] were significantly increased. When challenged with varying pH during gill perfusion, the pH of the artificial hemolymph remained relatively unchanged. Overall, ammonia production and excretion, as well as oxygen consumption, were reduced in crabs acclimated to elevated pCO2, demonstrating that either (amino acid) oxidation is reduced in response to this particular stress, or nitrogenous wastes are excreted in an alternative form. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

Acid–base regulation in the Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister)

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Environment; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
DOI
10.1007/s00227-014-2409-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Homeostatic regulation allows organisms to secure basic physiological processes in a varying environment. To counteract fluctuations in ambient carbonate system speciation due to elevated seawater pCO2 (hypercapnia), many aquatic crustaceans excrete/accumulate acid–base equivalents through their gills; however, not much is known about the role of ammonia in this response. The present study investigated the effects of hypercapnia on acid–base and ammonia regulation in the Dungeness crab, Metacarcinus magister on the whole animal and isolated gill levels. Hemolymph pCO2 and [HCO3 −] increased in M. magister acclimated to elevated pCO2 (330 Pa), while pH remained stable. Additionally, hemolymph [Na+], [Ca2+], and [SO4 2−] were significantly increased. When challenged with varying pH during gill perfusion, the pH of the artificial hemolymph remained relatively unchanged. Overall, ammonia production and excretion, as well as oxygen consumption, were reduced in crabs acclimated to elevated pCO2, demonstrating that either (amino acid) oxidation is reduced in response to this particular stress, or nitrogenous wastes are excreted in an alternative form.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 14, 2014

References

  • Cellular control over spicule formation in sea urchin embryos: a structural approach
    Beniash, E; Addadi, L; Weiner, S
  • The salt absorbing cells in the gills of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus, Rathbun) with notes on modified mitochondria
    Copeland, DE; Fitzjarrell, AT
  • Rapid transgenerational acclimation of a tropical reef fish to climate change
    Donelson, JM; Munday, PL; McCormick, MI; Pitcher, CR
  • Aspects of ionic transport mechanisms in crayfish Astacus leptodactylus
    Ehrenfeld, J
  • Ionic regulation in the Pacific edible crab, Cancer magister (Dana)
    Engelhardt, FR; Dehnel, PA
  • Differential acid–base regulation in various gills of the green crab Carcinus maenas: effects of elevated environmental pCO2
    Fehsenfeld, S; Weihrauch, D
  • Effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on gene expression patterns in the gills of the green crab, Carcinus maenas
    Fehsenfeld, S; Kiko, R; Appelhans, Y; Towle, DW; Zimmer, M; Melzner, F
  • Relationship between intracellular proton buffering capacity and intracellular pH
    Goldsmith, DJA; Hilton, PJ
  • Osmotic regulation in several crabs of the Pacific coast of North America
    Jones, LL
  • Changes in metabolic rate and N excretion in the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus under conditions of environmental hypercapnia: identifying effective acid–base variables
    Langenbuch, M; Pörtner, HO
  • Extra- and intracellular acid–base balance and ionic regulation in cod (Gadus morhua) during combined and isolated exposures to hypercapnia and copper
    Larsen, B; Pörtner, H; Jensen, F
  • Acid–base balance and ionic regulation during emersion in the estuarine intertidal crab Chasmagnathus granulata Dana (Decapoda Grapsidae)
    Luquet, CM; Ansaldo, M
  • Effects of high environmental ammonia on branchial ammonia excretion rates and tissue Rh-protein mRNA expression levels in seawater acclimated Dungeness crab Metacarcinus magister
    Martin, M; Fehsenfeld, S; Sourial, MM; Weihrauch, D
  • Parental environment mediates impacts of increased carbon dioxide on a coral reef fish
    Miller, GM; Watson, S-A; Donelson, JM; McCormick, MI; Munday, PL

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