Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Topology of MindPre-digital Forms of Hypertext

A Topology of Mind: Pre-digital Forms of Hypertext [The idea of hypertext and hypertexting arose with the Internet and the World Wide Web in which information from one document or Web site is linked to information in another document or Web site automatically when the user clicks on a hypertext link of text that is underlined in blue. If we define hyperlinking or hypertext more generally as the linking of one set of data or information with another set of data or information in another location, it is possible to identify pre-digital forms of hypertext in written documents and books including both handwritten and printed manuscripts or books. We will therefore make use of the definition of N. Katherine Hayles (2001), an American postmodern literary critic and electronic literature theorist more useful because it pertains to both pre-digital and digital hypertext. She wrote, “hypertext has at least these three elements: multiple reading paths; text that is chunked in some way; some kind of linking mechanism that connects the chunks together so as to create multiple reading paths.”] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Topology of MindPre-digital Forms of Hypertext

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/a-topology-of-mind-pre-digital-forms-of-hypertext-UUMxf1Q6I0

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2022
ISBN
978-3-030-96435-1
Pages
191 –204
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-96436-8_12
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The idea of hypertext and hypertexting arose with the Internet and the World Wide Web in which information from one document or Web site is linked to information in another document or Web site automatically when the user clicks on a hypertext link of text that is underlined in blue. If we define hyperlinking or hypertext more generally as the linking of one set of data or information with another set of data or information in another location, it is possible to identify pre-digital forms of hypertext in written documents and books including both handwritten and printed manuscripts or books. We will therefore make use of the definition of N. Katherine Hayles (2001), an American postmodern literary critic and electronic literature theorist more useful because it pertains to both pre-digital and digital hypertext. She wrote, “hypertext has at least these three elements: multiple reading paths; text that is chunked in some way; some kind of linking mechanism that connects the chunks together so as to create multiple reading paths.”]

Published: May 7, 2022

There are no references for this article.