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A Poetics of RelationIdentity in Relation

A Poetics of Relation: Identity in Relation [The authors examined in this study challenge the early postcolonial assumption of a uniform indigenous identity. Instead, they empha-size the significance of difference, especially based on gender, in shap-ing individual experience. In addition, they question the atavistic conception of history as a search for original purity. Their practice of linguistic métissage also illustrates their distrust of totalizing discourses that invariably construe national culture as static and their reluctance to be preserved from contaminat-ing, external influences. As is shown in this chapter, millennial women writers further contest the pan-Africanist claim to a single origin. Rather, they under-stand Caribbean identity to be in perpetual transformation and enriched by exchange, notably through syncretism, creolization, and immigration. Reject-ing the arborescent logic, both dualistic and exclusive, of the dominant national discourses discussed in Chapter 2, these authors point out the need to move beyond dichotomies, transcend borders, and open up to the region. Their dialogical conception of identity and the transnational nature of their narratives thereby relate to the construction of a pan-Caribbean discourse. The mangrove aesthetics expressed in their writing therefore calls for no less than a redefini-tion of individual and communal identity. In fact, rethinking identity has long characterized the local female literary tradition: across the region, for instance, early women writers anticipated the paradigmatic shift from a pan-African to a creolized identity.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Poetics of RelationIdentity in Relation

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2012
ISBN
978-1-349-29866-2
Pages
103 –127
DOI
10.1057/9781137089359_5
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The authors examined in this study challenge the early postcolonial assumption of a uniform indigenous identity. Instead, they empha-size the significance of difference, especially based on gender, in shap-ing individual experience. In addition, they question the atavistic conception of history as a search for original purity. Their practice of linguistic métissage also illustrates their distrust of totalizing discourses that invariably construe national culture as static and their reluctance to be preserved from contaminat-ing, external influences. As is shown in this chapter, millennial women writers further contest the pan-Africanist claim to a single origin. Rather, they under-stand Caribbean identity to be in perpetual transformation and enriched by exchange, notably through syncretism, creolization, and immigration. Reject-ing the arborescent logic, both dualistic and exclusive, of the dominant national discourses discussed in Chapter 2, these authors point out the need to move beyond dichotomies, transcend borders, and open up to the region. Their dialogical conception of identity and the transnational nature of their narratives thereby relate to the construction of a pan-Caribbean discourse. The mangrove aesthetics expressed in their writing therefore calls for no less than a redefini-tion of individual and communal identity. In fact, rethinking identity has long characterized the local female literary tradition: across the region, for instance, early women writers anticipated the paradigmatic shift from a pan-African to a creolized identity.]

Published: Nov 17, 2015

Keywords: Dominican Republic; Gender Identification; Caribbean Blackness; Woman Writer; Racial Pride

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