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A New Chapter in US-Cuba RelationsCuban Exceptionalism

A New Chapter in US-Cuba Relations: Cuban Exceptionalism [Like Americans, Cubans—on the island and in the diaspora—have laid claim to exceptionalism. Although American exceptional-ism may be self-evident, Cuba’s is not, at least to the outside world. Geographic location, the preeminence of Havana in colonial times, the cane-based economy when sugar meant wealth, the interest of European countries, and the special relationship with great powers like Spain and the United States engendered an uncommon national sense of self in Cuba. When Spain lost her prized colony, “more was lost in Cuba” took hold in the popular imagination of Spaniards as the response to any tale of woe. In 1959–1960, the Eisenhower administration seemed to be at a loss when trying to explain what had happened on the island. Like Spain, the United States had perceived the island to be “ever-faithful.”] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A New Chapter in US-Cuba RelationsCuban Exceptionalism

Part of the Studies of the Americas Book Series
Editors: Hershberg, Eric; LeoGrande, William M.

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016
ISBN
978-3-319-31151-7
Pages
101 –113
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-29595-4_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Like Americans, Cubans—on the island and in the diaspora—have laid claim to exceptionalism. Although American exceptional-ism may be self-evident, Cuba’s is not, at least to the outside world. Geographic location, the preeminence of Havana in colonial times, the cane-based economy when sugar meant wealth, the interest of European countries, and the special relationship with great powers like Spain and the United States engendered an uncommon national sense of self in Cuba. When Spain lost her prized colony, “more was lost in Cuba” took hold in the popular imagination of Spaniards as the response to any tale of woe. In 1959–1960, the Eisenhower administration seemed to be at a loss when trying to explain what had happened on the island. Like Spain, the United States had perceived the island to be “ever-faithful.”]

Published: Apr 18, 2016

Keywords: Foreign Investment; Diplomatic Relation; Slow Tempo; Cuban Revolution; Modus Vivendi

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