A Multi-Forest Comparison of Dietary Preferences and Seed Dispersal by Ateles spp

A Multi-Forest Comparison of Dietary Preferences and Seed Dispersal by Ateles spp Investigations of coevolutionary relationships between plants and the animals that disperse their seeds suggest that disperser-plant interactions are likely shaped by diffuse, rather than species-to-species, coevolution. We studied the role of dietary plasticity in shaping the potential for diffuse coevolution by comparing dietary fruit preferences and seed dispersal by 3 species of spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) in 4 moist forests in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Surinam. In all forests, spider monkeys were highly frugivorous and preyed upon seeds of few species. We estimated dietary use of fruiting taxa based on absolute consumption and preference, which accounts for resource availability. Of the 59 genera that comprised the 20 most frequently consumed genera summed in each forest, only 3—Brosimum (Moraceae), Cecropia (Cecropiaceae) and Virola (Myristicaceae)—ranked within the top 20 at every forest. Most genera were within the 20 most frequently consumed at only 1 or 2 forests. Based on preferences, only 4 genera ranked in the 20 most-preferred in all 4 forests: Brosimum, Cecropia, Ficus (Moracae), and Virola. Patterns in fruit consumption and preference at the familial level were similar in that only 2 families—Myristicaceae and Moraceae—were in the 10 most-consumed or most-preferred in all 4 forests. Interforest variation in plant specific composition and abundances and supra-annual fruiting phenologies, combined with dietary flexibility of Ateles spp., may partly explain these patterns. Our results suggest that variation in plant community structure strongly influences dietary preferences, and hence, seed dispersal by spider monkeys. Thus, diffuse coevolution in spider monkey-plant relationships may be limited to few taxa at the generic and familial levels. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Primatology Springer Journals

A Multi-Forest Comparison of Dietary Preferences and Seed Dispersal by Ateles spp

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/a-multi-forest-comparison-of-dietary-preferences-and-seed-dispersal-by-1DROlnBM29
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Anthropology; Animal Ecology; Human Genetics
ISSN
0164-0291
eISSN
1573-8604
DOI
10.1007/s10764-005-6456-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Investigations of coevolutionary relationships between plants and the animals that disperse their seeds suggest that disperser-plant interactions are likely shaped by diffuse, rather than species-to-species, coevolution. We studied the role of dietary plasticity in shaping the potential for diffuse coevolution by comparing dietary fruit preferences and seed dispersal by 3 species of spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) in 4 moist forests in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Surinam. In all forests, spider monkeys were highly frugivorous and preyed upon seeds of few species. We estimated dietary use of fruiting taxa based on absolute consumption and preference, which accounts for resource availability. Of the 59 genera that comprised the 20 most frequently consumed genera summed in each forest, only 3—Brosimum (Moraceae), Cecropia (Cecropiaceae) and Virola (Myristicaceae)—ranked within the top 20 at every forest. Most genera were within the 20 most frequently consumed at only 1 or 2 forests. Based on preferences, only 4 genera ranked in the 20 most-preferred in all 4 forests: Brosimum, Cecropia, Ficus (Moracae), and Virola. Patterns in fruit consumption and preference at the familial level were similar in that only 2 families—Myristicaceae and Moraceae—were in the 10 most-consumed or most-preferred in all 4 forests. Interforest variation in plant specific composition and abundances and supra-annual fruiting phenologies, combined with dietary flexibility of Ateles spp., may partly explain these patterns. Our results suggest that variation in plant community structure strongly influences dietary preferences, and hence, seed dispersal by spider monkeys. Thus, diffuse coevolution in spider monkey-plant relationships may be limited to few taxa at the generic and familial levels.

Journal

International Journal of PrimatologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off