A linear pathway for mevalonate production supports growth of Thermococcus kodakarensis

A linear pathway for mevalonate production supports growth of Thermococcus kodakarensis The sole unifying feature of Archaea is the use of isoprenoid-based glycerol lipid ethers to compose cellular membranes. The branched hydrocarbon tails of archaeal lipids are synthesized via the polymerization of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), but many questions still surround the pathway(s) that result in production of IPP and DMAPP in archaeal species. Isotopic-labeling strategies argue for multiple biological routes for production of mevalonate, but biochemical and bioinformatic studies support only a linear pathway for mevalonate production. Here, we use a combination of genetic and biochemical assays to detail the production of mevalonate in the model archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. We demonstrate that a single, linear pathway to mevalonate biosynthesis is essential and that alternative routes of mevalonate production, if present, are not biologically sufficient to support growth in the absence of the classical mevalonate pathway resulting in IPP production from acetyl-CoA. Archaeal species provide an ideal platform for production of high-value isoprenoids in large quantities, and the results obtained provide avenues to further increase the production of mevalonate to drive isoprenoid production in archaeal hosts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Extremophiles Springer Journals

A linear pathway for mevalonate production supports growth of Thermococcus kodakarensis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Biotechnology; Biochemistry, general; Microbial Ecology
ISSN
1431-0651
eISSN
1433-4909
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00792-019-01076-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The sole unifying feature of Archaea is the use of isoprenoid-based glycerol lipid ethers to compose cellular membranes. The branched hydrocarbon tails of archaeal lipids are synthesized via the polymerization of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), but many questions still surround the pathway(s) that result in production of IPP and DMAPP in archaeal species. Isotopic-labeling strategies argue for multiple biological routes for production of mevalonate, but biochemical and bioinformatic studies support only a linear pathway for mevalonate production. Here, we use a combination of genetic and biochemical assays to detail the production of mevalonate in the model archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. We demonstrate that a single, linear pathway to mevalonate biosynthesis is essential and that alternative routes of mevalonate production, if present, are not biologically sufficient to support growth in the absence of the classical mevalonate pathway resulting in IPP production from acetyl-CoA. Archaeal species provide an ideal platform for production of high-value isoprenoids in large quantities, and the results obtained provide avenues to further increase the production of mevalonate to drive isoprenoid production in archaeal hosts.

Journal

ExtremophilesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 23, 2019

References

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