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A Just Society for Ireland? 1964–19871965: The First Failure

A Just Society for Ireland? 1964–1987: 1965: The First Failure [The 1965 general election was the first public test for the Just Society. In the year between Fine Gael’s adoption of the nine-point plan and the unveiling of the manifesto, Towards a Just Society, work had been on-going to develop Costello’s proposals. In the resulting document, the outlined economic policies were largely in-line with the thinking of the day, influenced particularly by the French planning model, while the social policies reflected emerging thinking that challenged traditional practices and methods. The document was finalised only after the election was announced. Although there had been unease among certain elements of the party, no alternative policies had emerged during the course of the year. The Just Society, therefore, became official Fine Gael policy for the election almost by default. As a campaign tool, it would prove ineffective. Towards a Just Society was a statement of the problems in Ireland at the time and, though Costello offered some solutions, they were not the type of appealing promises that would be seen in the type of documents produced after Fianna Fáil’s give-away manifesto of 1977. Essentially, what Fine Gael published was a policy document, not an election manifesto in the accepted sense. It made little impact on the voters. With limited time to publicise the document, hampered also by restricted circulation, voters never had the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the content. At national level, the impact was further undermined by the leadership’s lacklustre endorsement, while, at constituency level, candidates opted instead to focus on local issues.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Just Society for Ireland? 1964–19871965: The First Failure

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References (12)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-43779-5
Pages
41 –62
DOI
10.1057/9781137022066_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The 1965 general election was the first public test for the Just Society. In the year between Fine Gael’s adoption of the nine-point plan and the unveiling of the manifesto, Towards a Just Society, work had been on-going to develop Costello’s proposals. In the resulting document, the outlined economic policies were largely in-line with the thinking of the day, influenced particularly by the French planning model, while the social policies reflected emerging thinking that challenged traditional practices and methods. The document was finalised only after the election was announced. Although there had been unease among certain elements of the party, no alternative policies had emerged during the course of the year. The Just Society, therefore, became official Fine Gael policy for the election almost by default. As a campaign tool, it would prove ineffective. Towards a Just Society was a statement of the problems in Ireland at the time and, though Costello offered some solutions, they were not the type of appealing promises that would be seen in the type of documents produced after Fianna Fáil’s give-away manifesto of 1977. Essentially, what Fine Gael published was a policy document, not an election manifesto in the accepted sense. It made little impact on the voters. With limited time to publicise the document, hampered also by restricted circulation, voters never had the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the content. At national level, the impact was further undermined by the leadership’s lacklustre endorsement, while, at constituency level, candidates opted instead to focus on local issues.]

Published: Oct 20, 2015

Keywords: Intellectual Disability; European Economic Community; Youth Work; Minority Government; Detention Centre

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