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The strengths and limitations of teams for detecting problems

The strengths and limitations of teams for detecting problems Problem detection in operational settings requires expertise and vigilance. It is a difficult task for individuals. If a problem is not detected early enough, the opportunity to avoid or reduce its consequences may be lost. Teams have many strengths that individuals lack. The team can attend to a wider range of cues than any of the individuals can. They can offer a wider range of expertise, represent different perspectives, reorganize their efforts to adapt to situational demands, and work in parallel. These should improve problem detection. However, teams can also fall victim to a wide range of barriers that may reduce their alertness, mask early problem indicators, confound attempts to make sense of initial data, and restrict their range of actions. Therefore, teams may not necessarily be superior to individuals at problem detection. The capability of a team to detect problems may be a useful measure of the team’s maturity and competence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Cognition, Technology & Work" Springer Journals

The strengths and limitations of teams for detecting problems

"Cognition, Technology & Work" , Volume 8 (4) – Dec 2, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer-Verlag London Limited
Subject
Computer Science; Computing Methodologies ; User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction
ISSN
1435-5558
eISSN
1435-5566
DOI
10.1007/s10111-005-0024-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Problem detection in operational settings requires expertise and vigilance. It is a difficult task for individuals. If a problem is not detected early enough, the opportunity to avoid or reduce its consequences may be lost. Teams have many strengths that individuals lack. The team can attend to a wider range of cues than any of the individuals can. They can offer a wider range of expertise, represent different perspectives, reorganize their efforts to adapt to situational demands, and work in parallel. These should improve problem detection. However, teams can also fall victim to a wide range of barriers that may reduce their alertness, mask early problem indicators, confound attempts to make sense of initial data, and restrict their range of actions. Therefore, teams may not necessarily be superior to individuals at problem detection. The capability of a team to detect problems may be a useful measure of the team’s maturity and competence.

Journal

"Cognition, Technology & Work"Springer Journals

Published: Dec 2, 2005

References