The elevated expression of calcitonin receptor by cells recruited into the endothelial layer and neo-intima of atherosclerotic plaque

The elevated expression of calcitonin receptor by cells recruited into the endothelial layer and... Calcitonin receptor-immunoreactive (CTR-ir) endothelial and foam cells were identified in atherosclerotic plaque within the abdominal and thoracic aortas of rabbits fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet. Initially, cells within the endothelial layers of nascent atherosclerotic plaque of arteries were also CD34-positive, a marker of precursor cells of the haematopoietic lineage. In a further rabbit model with more advanced cardiovascular disease, CTR-ir cells were located deeper within the plaque as well as within the endothelial layer overlying the neo-intima. Finally, in the third model, in which the 4-week period on the atherogenic diet was followed by a 12-week period of regression on a normal chow diet, during which serum cholesterol levels returned to the normal range, CTR-ir was markedly reduced in the stabilized fibrous cap of plaque. Thus, the expression of CTR is associated with the early cellular events involved in plaque formation and is down-regulated as stabilisation of plaque progresses in the process of healing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Histochemistry and Cell Biology Springer Journals

The elevated expression of calcitonin receptor by cells recruited into the endothelial layer and neo-intima of atherosclerotic plaque

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general ; Anatomy
ISSN
0948-6143
eISSN
1432-119X
DOI
10.1007/s00418-009-0600-6
pmid
19404669
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Calcitonin receptor-immunoreactive (CTR-ir) endothelial and foam cells were identified in atherosclerotic plaque within the abdominal and thoracic aortas of rabbits fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet. Initially, cells within the endothelial layers of nascent atherosclerotic plaque of arteries were also CD34-positive, a marker of precursor cells of the haematopoietic lineage. In a further rabbit model with more advanced cardiovascular disease, CTR-ir cells were located deeper within the plaque as well as within the endothelial layer overlying the neo-intima. Finally, in the third model, in which the 4-week period on the atherogenic diet was followed by a 12-week period of regression on a normal chow diet, during which serum cholesterol levels returned to the normal range, CTR-ir was markedly reduced in the stabilized fibrous cap of plaque. Thus, the expression of CTR is associated with the early cellular events involved in plaque formation and is down-regulated as stabilisation of plaque progresses in the process of healing.

Journal

Histochemistry and Cell BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2009

References

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