Antiradical and antimicrobial properties of cold-pressed black cumin and cumin oils

Antiradical and antimicrobial properties of cold-pressed black cumin and cumin oils Cold-pressed black cumin seed oil (BCSO) and cumin seed oil (CSO) were evaluated for their fatty acid profiles, phytosterol and tocopherol contents, antiradical properties and inhibition of microbial growth. The main fatty acids in BCSO were linoleic followed by oleic and palmitic acids. Petroselinic acid (C18:1n-12) was the main fatty acid in CSO, while linoleic acid was the second major unsaturated acid. Six sterol compounds were measured in BCSO and CSO, wherein the sterol marker was β-sitosterol. α-Tocopherol constituted 45% of tocopherols in BCSO, while β-tocopherol was the main component in CSO. BCSO and CSO oils had higher antiradical action against DPPH· and galvinoxyl radicals than virgin olive oil. Antimicrobial properties of BCSO and CSO were studied, and the results revealed that CSO inhibited the growth of all microorganisms tested, while BCSO inhibited the growth of all microorganisms tested except A. niger and A. flavus. BCSO and CSO had a drastic effect on the biosynthesis of protein and lipids in cells of B. subtilis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Food Research and Technology Springer Journals

Antiradical and antimicrobial properties of cold-pressed black cumin and cumin oils

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Abstract

Cold-pressed black cumin seed oil (BCSO) and cumin seed oil (CSO) were evaluated for their fatty acid profiles, phytosterol and tocopherol contents, antiradical properties and inhibition of microbial growth. The main fatty acids in BCSO were linoleic followed by oleic and palmitic acids. Petroselinic acid (C18:1n-12) was the main fatty acid in CSO, while linoleic acid was the second major unsaturated acid. Six sterol compounds were measured in BCSO and CSO, wherein the sterol marker was β-sitosterol. α-Tocopherol constituted 45% of tocopherols in BCSO, while β-tocopherol was the main component in CSO. BCSO and CSO oils had higher antiradical action against DPPH· and galvinoxyl radicals than virgin olive oil. Antimicrobial properties of BCSO and CSO were studied, and the results revealed that CSO inhibited the growth of all microorganisms tested, while BCSO inhibited the growth of all microorganisms tested except A. niger and A. flavus. BCSO and CSO had a drastic effect on the biosynthesis of protein and lipids in cells of B. subtilis.

Journal

European Food Research and TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 23, 2012

References

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